Switch to: References

Citations of:

Expectations without content

Mind and Language 25 (2):217-236 (2010)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Review of C. Koopman, Pragmatism as Transition. Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty. [REVIEW]Roberto Frega - 2009 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 1 (1).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Training, Training, Training: The Making of Second Nature and the Root's of Wittgenstein's Pragmatism.Michael Luntley - 2012 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 4 (2):88-104.
    Both Wittgenstein and Dewey have a role for the concept of skills and tech-niques in their understanding of practices and thereby the possession of concepts. Skills are typically acquired through training. It can seem, however, that their respective appeals to practice are dissimilar: Dewey’s appeal is, like Peirce’s, programmatic. It is meant to do philosophical work. In contrast, for Wittgenstein, the appeal to practice can seem a primitive, something that is meant to put an end to philosophical work. I argue (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • On Education and Initiation.Michael Luntley - 2009 - Philosophy of Education 43 (Supplement s1):41-56.
    In this paper I take up Peters' invitation to think of education in terms of initiation. I argue that the concept of initiation demands much closer scrutiny and analysis in order to provide a substantive thesis about education. A key challenge concerns how we conceive of the initiate. The very idea of initiation suggests that, in some interesting sense, the pupil qua initiate joins in learning activities; their role is more than that of passive recipient of values and belief. But (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Play's the Thing: Wherein We Find How Learning Can Begin.Michael Luntley - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 52 (1):36-53.
    In this paper I outline an answer to the following question: What are the abilities that make you the sort of subject who can learn, who can acquire new concepts, new skills? There are many traits that matter in providing an answer. But I want to suggest that the ability for creative and imaginative engagement with and sustenance of the playful patterns of our aesthetic experience is core. I identify a core sense of play that fills this role. Play's the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • What’s the Problem with Dewey?Michael Luntley - 2016 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 8 (1).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation