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  1. Hume and the Implanted Knowledge of God.Nathan Sasser - 2015 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 13 (1):17-35.
    Hume is justly famous for his criticisms of theistic proofs. However, what is less well-known is that Hume also criticized the claim that belief in God, simply because it is natural, is justified without supporting argument. Hume certainly encountered this claim in his own Protestant milieu, as various textual clues throughout his corpus indicate. His own endorsement of natural beliefs raises the possibility that religious belief might be justified without argument. One of Hume's chief aims in The Natural History of (...)
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  • David Hume et les règles générales.André Lapidus - 2020 - Philosophiques 47 (1):189-224.
    This paper supports the contention that the general rules introduced by Hume in the Treatise on Human Nature are a selection mechanism for inductive inferences, which rejects two sources of inefficiency : from emotional origin, which would reduce the uneasiness coming from a possible failure in the uniformity of nature ; from cognitive origin, which would tolerate the possible overflow of the imagination on judgment. A growing consensus in recent decades, which distinguishes between two kinds of rules — extensive and (...)
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  • What the Wise Ought Believe: A Voluntarist Interpretation of Hume's General Rules.Ryan Hickerson - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (6):1133-1153.
    This paper advances an interpretation of what Hume called ‘the general rules’: natural principles of belief-formation that nevertheless can be augmented via reflection. According to Hume, reflection is, in part, what separates the wise from the vulgar. In this paper, I argue that for Hume being wise must therefore be, to some degree, voluntary. Hume faced a significant problem in attempting to reconcile his epistemic normativity, i.e. his claims about what we ought to believe, with his largely involuntarist theory of (...)
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  • David Hume als therapeutischer Philosoph. Eine Auflösung der Induktionsproblematik mit wittgensteinianischer Methode.Friederike Schmitz - 2013 - Dissertation, Universität Heidelberg
    Ziel der Arbeit ist zu zeigen, dass sich in der theoretischen Philosophie David Humes Ansätze zu einer therapeutischen Methode finden, wie sie von Ludwig Wittgenstein angewandt und beschrieben wurde. Im ersten Teil wird Wittgensteins Konzeption der Philosophie und ihre Anwendung anhand einer genauen Textexegese dargestellt. Der zweite Teil untersucht primär die Humeschen Überlegungen zu Kausalität und Induktion, seine methodologischen Aussagen sowie seine Perzeptionstheorie und argumentiert für die These, dass Hume ebenfalls, wenn auch mit Einschränkungen, Elemente einer therapeutischen Methode und eine (...)
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