Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Dialogue in the making: emotional engagement with materials.Ingar Brinck & Vasudevi Reddy - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (1):23-45.
    Taking a psychological and philosophical outlook, we approach making as an embodied and embedded skill via the skilled artisan’s experience of having a corporeal, nonlinguistic dialogue with the material while working with it. We investigate the dynamic relation between maker and material through the lens of pottery as illustrated by wheel throwing, claiming that the experience of dialogue signals an emotional involvement with clay. The examination of Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology of habit, the skilled intentionality framework, and material engagement theory shows that (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Réponses À Marta Caravà, Jean-Marie Chevalier Et Roberta Dreon.Pierre Steiner - 2020 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 12 (1).
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Institutions and Other Things: Critical Hermeneutics, Postphenomenology and Material Engagement Theory.Tailer G. Ransom & Shaun Gallagher - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-8.
    Don Ihde and Lambros Malafouris have argued that “we are homo faber not just because we make things but also because we are made by them.” The emphasis falls on the idea that the things that we create, use, rely on—that is, those things with which we engage—have a recursive effect on human existence. We make things, but we also make arrangements, many of which are long-standing, material, social, normative, economic, institutional, and/or political, and many of which are supported by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Apperceptive Patterning: Artefaction, Extensional Beliefs and Cognitive Scaffolding.Ekin Erkan - 2020 - Cosmos and History 16 (1):125-178.
    In “Psychopower and Ordinary Madness” my ambition, as it relates to Bernard Stiegler’s recent literature, was twofold: 1) critiquing Stiegler’s work on exosomatization and artefactual posthumanism—or, more specifically, nonhumanism—to problematize approaches to media archaeology that rely upon technical exteriorization; 2) challenging how Stiegler engages with Giuseppe Longo and Francis Bailly’s conception of negative entropy. These efforts were directed by a prevalent techno-cultural qualifier: the rise of Synthetic Intelligence (including neural nets, deep learning, predictive processing and Bayesian models of cognition). This (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark