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  1. Public war and the requirement of legitimate authority.Yuan Yuan - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-24.
    This paper offers a non-reductivist account of the requirement of legitimate authority in warfare. I first advance a distinction between private and public wars. A war is private where individuals defend their private rights with their private means. A war is public where it either aims to defend public rights or relies on public means. I argue that RLA applies to public war but not private war. A public war waged by a belligerent without legitimate authority involves a form of (...)
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  • Legitimate Authority as a Jus Ad Bellum Condition: Defense of a Procedural Requirement in Just War Theory.Jordy Rocheleau - 2020 - Journal of Military Ethics 19 (2):99-117.
    Today, it is widely held that while authorization may be helpful in assuring that the other jus ad bellum criteria are met, legitimate authority is not itself a condition for just recourse to war....
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  • Introduction: Legitimate Authority, War, and the Ethics of Rebellion.Christopher J. Finlay, Jonathan Parry & Pål Wrange - 2017 - Ethics and International Affairs 31 (2):167-168.
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  • Does Who Matter? Legal Authority and the Use of Military Violence.Pål Wrange - 2017 - Ethics and International Affairs 31 (2):191-212.
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  • Liability, Community, and Just Conduct in War.Jonathan Parry - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (12):3313-3333.
    Those of us who are not pacifists face an obvious challenge. Common-sense morality contains a stringent constraint on intentional killing, yet war involves homicide on a grand scale. If wars are to be morally justified, it needs be shown how this conflict can be reconciled. A major fault line running throughout the contemporary just war literature divides two approaches to attempting this reconciliation. On a ‘reductivist’ view, defended most prominently by Jeff McMahan, the conflict is largely illusory, since such killing (...)
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