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  1. Reflective Disequilibrium: A Critical Evaluation of the Complete Lives Framework for Healthcare Rationing.Xavier Symons - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (2):108-112.
    One prominent view in recent literature on resource allocation is Persad, Emanuel and Wertheimer’s complete lives framework for the rationing of lifesaving healthcare interventions. CLF states that we should prioritise the needs of individuals who have had less opportunity to experience the events that characterise a complete life. Persad et al argue that their system is the product of a successful process of reflective equilibrium—a philosophical methodology whereby theories, principles and considered judgements are balanced with each other and revised until (...)
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  • Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Complete Lives in the Balance”.Samuel J. Kerstein & Greg Bognar - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):W3 – W5.
    The allocation of scarce health care resources such as flu treatment or organs for transplant presents stark problems of distributive justice. Persad, Wertheimer, and Emanuel have recently proposed a novel system for such allocation. Their “complete lives system” incorporates several principles, including ones that prescribe saving the most lives, preserving the most life-years, and giving priority to persons between 15 and 40 years old. This paper argues that the system lacks adequate moral foundations. Persad and colleagues' defense of giving priority (...)
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  • Let Us Be Fair to 5-Year-Olds: Priority for the Young in the Allocation of Scarce Health Resources.Kelsey Gipe & Samuel J. Kerstein - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (3):325-335.
    Life-saving health resources like organs for transplant and experimental medications are persistently scarce. How ought we, morally speaking, to ration these resources? Many hold that, in any morally acceptable allocation scheme, the young should to some extent be prioritized over the old. Govind Persad, Alan Wertheimer and Ezekiel Emanuel propose a multi-principle allocation scheme called the Complete Lives System, according to which persons roughly between 15 and 40 years old get priority over younger children and older adults, other things being (...)
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