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  1. Typology and Natural Kinds in Evo-Devo.Ingo Brigandt - 2021 - In Laura Nuño De La Rosa & Gerd Müller (eds.), Evolutionary Developmental Biology: A Reference Guide. Cham: Springer. pp. 483-493.
    The traditional practice of establishing morphological types and investigating morphological organization has found new support from evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo), especially with respect to the notion of body plans. Despite recurring claims that typology is at odds with evolutionary thinking, evo-devo offers mechanistic explanations of the evolutionary origin, transformation, and evolvability of morphological organization. In parallel, philosophers have developed non-essentialist conceptions of natural kinds that permit kinds to exhibit variation and undergo change. This not only facilitates a construal of species (...)
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  • The Limits of Measuring Information in Biology: An Ontological Approach.Agustín Mercado-Reyes & Alfonso Arroyo-Santos - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (3).
    The concept of biological information, and information in general, usually presupposes a purely quantitative view of reality. Even though actualist quantification has an important place in the description of the world, a nominalistic stance that tries to simplify reality in purely actualist terms inevitably runs into inconsistencies; these inconsistencies have been pointed out by the critical assessments of the notion of biological information. Rather than calling for an abandonment of the informational terminology, we try to rethink information as a part (...)
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  • Who's Afraid of Epigenetics? Habits, Instincts, and Charles Darwin’s Evolutionary Theory.Mauro Mandrioli & Mariagrazia Portera - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (1):1-23.
    Our paper aims at bringing to the fore the crucial role that habits play in Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution by means of natural selection. We have organized the paper in two steps: first, we analyse value and functions of the concept of habit in Darwin's early works, notably in his Notebooks, and compare these views to his mature understanding of the concept in the Origin of Species and later works; second, we discuss Darwin’s ideas on habits in the light (...)
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  • Structural Powers and the Homeodynamic Unity of Organisms.Christopher J. Austin & Anna Marmodoro - 2017 - In William M. R. Simpson, Robert C. Koons & Nicholas J. Teh (eds.), Neo-Aristotelian Perspectives on Contemporary Science. Routledge. pp. 169-184.
    Although they are continually compositionally reconstituted and reconfigured, organisms nonetheless persist as ontologically unified beings over time – but in virtue of what? A common answer is: in virtue of their continued possession of the capacity for morphological invariance which persists through, and in spite of, their mereological alteration. While we acknowledge that organisms‟ capacity for the “stability of form” – homeostasis - is an important aspect of their diachronic unity, we argue that this capacity is derived from, and grounded (...)
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  • What Does It Take to Become 'Best Friends'? Evolutionary Changes in Canine Social Competence.Ádám Miklósi & József Topál - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (6):287-294.
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  • Adaptive Developmental Plasticity Might Not Contribute Much to the Adaptiveness of Reproductive Strategies.Lars Penke - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):38-39.
    Del Giudice's model belongs among those that highlight the role of adaptive developmental plasticity in human reproductive strategies; but at least three other forms of evolutionary adaptation also influence reproductive behavior. Similar to earlier models, the existing evidence suggests that Del Giudice's hypothesized effects are rather weak. In particular, adult attachment styles are hardly predictive of outcomes visible to natural selection.
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