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  1. Evidence-Based Neuroethics, Deep Brain Stimulation and Personality - Deflating, but Not Bursting, the Bubble.Jonathan Pugh, Laurie Pycroft, Hannah Maslen, Tipu Aziz & Julian Savulescu - forthcoming - Neuroethics.
    Gilbert et al. have raised important questions about the empirical grounding of neuroethical analyses of the apparent phenomenon of Deep Brain Stimulation ‘causing’ personality changes. In this paper, we consider how to make neuroethical claims appropriately calibrated to existing evidence, and the role that philosophical neuroethics has to play in this enterprise of ‘evidence-based neuroethics’. In the first half of the paper, we begin by highlighting the challenges we face in investigating changes to PIAAAS following DBS, explaining how different trial (...)
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  • No Going Back? Reversibility and Why It Matters for Deep Brain Stimulation.Jonathan Pugh - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (4):225-230.
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is frequently described as a ‘reversible’ medical treatment, and the reversibility of DBS is often cited as an important reason for preferring it to brain lesioning procedures as a last resort treatment modality for patients suffering from treatment-refractory conditions. Despite its widespread acceptance, the claim that DBS is reversible has recently come under attack. Critics have pointed out that data are beginning to suggest that there can be non-stimulation-dependent effects of DBS. Furthermore, we lack long-term data (...)
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