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  1. A Terminological and Ontological Analysis of the NCI Thesaurus.Werner Ceusters, Barry Smith & Louis Goldberg - 2005 - Methods of Information in Medicine 44 (4):498-507.
    We performed a qualitative analysis of the Thesaurus in order to assess its conformity with principles of good practice in terminology and ontology design. We used both the on-line browsable version of the Thesaurus and its OWL-representation (version 04.08b, released on August 2, 2004), measuring each in light of the requirements put forward in relevant ISO terminology standards and in light of ontological principles advanced in the recent literature. Version 04.08b of the NCI Thesaurus suffers from the same broad range (...)
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  • Using Philosophy to Improve the Coherence and Interoperability of Applications Ontologies: A Field Report on the Collaboration of IFOMIS and L&C.Jonathan Simon, James Matthew Fielding & Barry Smith - 2004 - In Proceedings of the First Workshop on Philosophy and Informatics. Deutsches Forschungs­zentrum für künstliche Intelligenz, Cologne: 2004 (CEUR Workshop Proceedings 112). pp. 65-72.
    The collaboration of Language and Computing nv (L&C) and the Institute for Formal Ontology and Medical Information Science (IFOMIS) is guided by the hypothesis that quality constraints on ontologies for software ap-plication purposes closely parallel the constraints salient to the design of sound philosophical theories. The extent of this parallel has been poorly appreciated in the informatics community, and it turns out that importing the benefits of phi-losophical insight and methodology into application domains yields a variety of improvements. L&C’s LinKBase® (...)
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  • Ontologies and Terminologies: Continuum or Dichotomy?Natalia Grabar, Thierry Hamon & Olivier Bodenreider - 2012 - Applied Ontology 7 (4):375-386.
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  • Formalizing Biomedical Concepts From Textual Definitions.Alina Petrova, Yue Ma, George Tsatsaronis, Maria Kissa, Felix Distel, Franz Baader & Michael Schroeder - unknown
    BACKGROUND: Ontologies play a major role in life sciences, enabling a number of applications, from new data integration to knowledge verification. SNOMED CT is a large medical ontology that is formally defined so that it ensures global consistency and support of complex reasoning tasks. Most biomedical ontologies and taxonomies on the other hand define concepts only textually, without the use of logic. Here, we investigate how to automatically generate formal concept definitions from textual ones. We develop a method that uses (...)
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