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  1. Deleuze and the Queer Ethics of an Empirical Education.Paul Andrew Moran - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (2):155-169.
    Axiomatic and problematic approaches to ontology are discussed, at first in relation to the work of Badiou and Deleuze in mathematics. This discussion is then broadened focussing on problematics in Deleuze and Guattari’s critiques of capitalism and psychoanalysis which results in an analysis of the implications of this discussion for education. From this, education as being already there, which is an assumption in some strands of philosophy of education, following Deleuze’s critique of axiomatic presentations of ontological identities, is described as (...)
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  • The Praxis of Alain Badiou.Paul Ashton, A. J. Bartlett & Justin Clemens (eds.) - 2006 - Re.Press.
    Following the publication of his magnum opus L’être et l’événement (Being and Event) in 1988, Alain Badiou has been acclaimed as one of France’s greatest living philosophers. Since then, he has released a dozen books, including Manifesto for Philosophy, Conditions, Metapolitics and Logiques des mondes (Logics of Worlds), many of which are now available in English translation. Badiou writes on an extraordinary array of topics, and his work has already had an impact upon studies in the history of philosophy, the (...)
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  • The Conditions of the New.Daniel W. Smith - 2007 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 1 (1):1-21.
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  • Wounds and Scars: Deleuze on the Time and Ethics of the Event.Jack Reynolds - 2007 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 1 (2):144-166.
    This paper explores the idea that Deleuze’s oeuvre is best understood as a philosophy of the wound, synonymous with a philosophy of the event. Although this wound/scar typology may appear to be a metaphorical conceit, the motif of the wound recurs frequently and perhaps even symptomatically in many of Deleuze’s texts, particularly where he is attempting to delineate some of the most important differences (transcendental, temporal, and ethical) between himself and his phenomenological predecessors. I raise some some potential problems for (...)
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  • The Role of Ontology in the Philosophy of Gilles Deleuze.Taylor Hammer - 2007 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (1):57-77.
    This essay discusses the role of being and ontology in the work of Gilles Deleuze. Starting from an examination of Alain Badiou’s ontology and theory of the event, I discuss the possible opposition of being and the event in Deleuze’s work. Though famous for his discussions of the univocity of being, Deleuze does discuss the event as that which is not being. Deleuze’s theory of the event is similar to that of Badiou in that he considers the event to be (...)
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  • Wounds and Scars: Deleuze on the Time (and the Ethics) of the Event.Jack Reynolds - 2007 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 1 (2):15.
    This essay examines Deleuze's account of time and the wound in The Logic of Sense and, to a lesser extent, in Difference and Repetition. As such, it will also explicate his understanding of the event, as well as the notoriously opaque ethics of counter-actualisation that are bound up with it, before raising certain problems that are associated with the transcendental and ethical priority that he accords to the event and what he calls the time of Aion. I will conclude by (...)
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  • Deleuze and Badiou on the Nature of Events.Brent Adkins - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (8):507-516.
    While any number of topics would serve to compare and contrast Deleuze and Badiou, this article will focus on the event. Focusing on the event serves several purposes. First, it provides a vantage point from which to elucidate a number of key topics in both philosophers. Second, while Badiou’s most recent work is already organized around his conception of the event, Deleuze’s discussion of the event is more diffuse. Thus, a discussion of the event in Deleuze will serve as heuristic (...)
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