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  1. Editorial Introduction.Campbell Jones - 2007 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 16 (3):196-202.
    This special issue presents the results of a three‐day conference that was held between 27 and 29 October 2005 at the Centre for Philosophy and Political Economy at the University of Leicester. The papers in this issue approach the work of Emmanuel Levinas and respond to him in different ways. Some introduce his work, some apply it in various contexts, some propose to extend it, while others question it. The issue also includes, in English for the first time, a translation (...)
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  • Editorial Introduction.Campbell Jones - 2007 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 16 (3):196–202.
    This special issue contains papers first presented at a conference that was held 14–16 May 2008 at the Centre for Philosophy and Political Economy at the University of Leicester. Each of the papers takes up ideas from the works of Jacques Derrida and seeks to apply these to questions of business, ethics and business ethics. The papers take up quite different parts of Derrida's works, from his work on the animal, narrative and story, the violence of codification and the limits (...)
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  • Catering to Otherness: Levinasian Consumer Ethics at Restaurant Day.Joel Hietanen & Antti Sihvonen - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (2):261-276.
    There is a rich tradition of inquiry in consumer research into how collective consumption manifests in various forms and contexts. While this literature has shown how group cohesion prescribes ethical and moral positions, our study explores how ethicality can arise from consumers and their relations in a more emergent fashion. To do so, we present a Levinasian perspective on consumer ethics through a focus on Restaurant Day, a global food carnival that is organized by consumers themselves. Our ethnographic findings highlight (...)
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  • Fair Trade and the Fetishization of Levinasian Ethics.Juan Ignacio Staricco - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (1):1-16.
    The certification-based Fair Trade initiative has been steadily growing during the last two decades. While many scholars have analyzed its main characteristics and developments, only a few have assessed it against a concept of justice. And those exceptional cases have only focused on distributive justice, proving unable to grasp the important ethical elements that Fair Trade integrates in its project. In reaction to this, this article intends to critically examine what the Fair Trade movement proposes to be ‘fair’ by resorting (...)
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  • Toward an Intermediate Position on Corporate Moral Personhood.Kevin Gibson - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (S1):71-81.
    Models of moral responsibility rely on foundational views about moral agency. Many scholars believe that only humans can be moral agents, and therefore business needs to create models that foster greater receptivity to others through ethical dialog. This view leads to a difficulty if no specific person is the sole causal agent for an act, or if something comes about through aggregated action in a corporate setting. An alternate approach suggests that corporations are moral agents sufficiently like humans to be (...)
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  • A Dynamic Stakeholder Model: An Other‐Oriented Ethical Approach.Akram Hatami & Naser Firoozi - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (3):349-360.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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