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On Anthropological Knowledge

Cambridge University Press (1985)

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  1. Does "Think" Mean the Same Thing as "Believe"? Linguistic Insights Into Religious Cognition.Larisa Heiphetz, Casey Landers & Neil Van Leeuwen - 2021 - Psychology of Religion and Spirituality 13 (3):287-297.
    When someone says she believes that God exists, is she expressing the same kind of mental state as when she says she thinks that a lake bigger than Lake Michigan exists⎯i.e., does she refer to the same kind of cognitive attitude in both cases? Using evidence from linguistic corpora (Study 1) and behavioral experiments (Studies 2-4), the current work provides evidence that individuals typically use the word “believe” more in conjunction with statements about religious credences and “think” more in conjunction (...)
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  • Believing Selves: Negotiating Social and Psychological Experiences of Belief.Steven Carlisle & Gregory M. Simon - 2012 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 40 (3):221-236.
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  • Believing Selves: Negotiating Social and Psychological Experiences of Belief.Steven Carlisle & Gregory M. Simon - 2012 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 40 (3):221-236.
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  • Creative Sincerity: Thai Buddhist Karma Narratives and the Grounding of Truths.Steven Carlisle - 2012 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 40 (3):317-340.
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  • Creative Sincerity: Thai Buddhist Karma Narratives and the Grounding of Truths.Steven Carlisle - 2012 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 40 (3):317-340.
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  • Can We Believe What We Do Not Understand?François Recanati - 1997 - Mind and Language 12 (1):84-100.
    In a series of papers, Sperber provides the following analysis of the phenomenon of ill-understood belief (or 'quasi-belief', as I call it): (i) the quasi-believer has a validating meta-belief, to the effect that a certain representation is true; yet (ii) that representation does not give rise to a plain belief, because it is 'semi-propositional'. In this paper I discuss several aspects of this treatment. In particular, I deny that the representation accepted by the quasi-believer is semantically indeterminate, and I reject (...)
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  • Epistemic Vigilance.Dan Sperber, Fabrice Clément, Christophe Heintz, Olivier Mascaro, Hugo Mercier, Gloria Origgi & Deirdre Wilson - 2010 - Mind and Language 25 (4):359-393.
    Humans massively depend on communication with others, but this leaves them open to the risk of being accidentally or intentionally misinformed. To ensure that, despite this risk, communication remains advantageous, humans have, we claim, a suite of cognitive mechanisms for epistemic vigilance. Here we outline this claim and consider some of the ways in which epistemic vigilance works in mental and social life by surveying issues, research and theories in different domains of philosophy, linguistics, cognitive psychology and the social sciences.
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  • Illocutionary Forces and What is Said.M. Kissine - 2009 - Mind and Language 24 (1):122-138.
    A psychologically plausible analysis of the way we assign illocutionary forces to utterances is formulated using a 'contextualist' analysis of what is said. The account offered makes use of J. L. Austin's distinction between phatic acts (sentence meaning), locutionary acts (contextually determined what is said), illocutionary acts, and perolocutionary acts. In order to avoid the conflation between illocutionary and perlocutionary levels, assertive, directive and commissive illocutionary forces are defined in terms of inferential potential with respect to the common ground. Illocutionary (...)
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  • Relevance: Communication and Cognition.Daniel Hirst - 1989 - Mind and Language 4 (1-2):138-146.
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  • Multiple Review.Robyn Carston - 1987 - Mind and Language 2 (4):333-349.
    Gavagai! or the Future History of the Animal Language Controversy. By DAVID PREMACK.
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  • Metaphor, Relevance and the 'Emergent Property' Issue.Deirdre Wilson & Robyn Carston - 2006 - Mind and Language 21 (3):404-433.
    The interpretation of metaphorical utterances often results in the attribution of emergent properties, which are neither standardly associated with the individual constituents in isolation nor derivable by standard rules of semantic composition. An adequate pragmatic account of metaphor interpretation must explain how these properties are derived. Using the framework of relevance theory, we propose a wholly inferential account, and argue that the derivation of emergent properties involves no special interpretive mechanisms not required for the interpretation of ordinary, literal utterances.
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  • What Are Cultural Attractors?Andrew Buskell - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (3):377-394.
    Concepts from cultural attractor theory are now used in domains far from their original home in anthropology and cultural evolution. Yet these concepts have not been consistently characterised. I here distinguish four ways in which the cultural attractor concept has been used and identify three kinds of factors of attraction typically appealed to. Clarifying these explanatory concepts identifies problems and ambiguities in the work of cultural epidemiologists and commentators alike.
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  • Intuitive and Reflective Inferences.Hugo Mercier & Dan Sperber - 2009 - In Keith Frankish & Jonathan St B. T. Evans (eds.), In Two Minds: Dual Processes and Beyond. Oxford University Press. pp. 149--170.
    Much evidence has accumulated in favor of such a dual view of reasoning. There is however some vagueness in the way the two systems are characterized. Instead of a principled distinction, we are presented with a bundle of contrasting features - slow/fast, automatic/controlled, explicit/implicit, associationist/rule based, modular/central - that, depending on the specific dual process theory, are attributed more or less exclusively to one of the two systems. As Evans states in a recent review, “it would then be helpful to (...)
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  • How Theories of Meaning Resemble Attributed Situations: Methodological Suggestions for Representing How People Conceive the Contents of Theories of Meaning, Extracting Signifiers’ Identity Conditions, and Measuring Domains for Allowed Influences.Sami Rissanen - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Reading
    This thesis develops methods for representing how the contents of theories of meaning become conceived by their users. These contents are treated as the range of systematically elicited conceptions afforded by a designated corpus of key texts. The approach being taken involves first detailing a formal scheme for the components of situations attributed to various entities. This scheme is then applied as a framing device to form a template which accounts for the shared structure between the mental spaces which embody (...)
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  • When Worlds Collide in Legal Discourse. The Accommodation of Indigenous Australians’ Concepts of Land Rights Into Australian Law.Thomas Christiansen - 2020 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 65 (1):21-41.
    The right of Australian Indigenous groups to own traditional lands has been a contentious issue in the recent history of Australia. Indeed, Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders did not consider themselves as full citizens in the country they had inhabited for millennia until the late 1960s, and then only after a long campaign and a national referendum in favour of changes to the Australian Constitution to remove restrictions on the services available to Indigenous Australians. The concept of terra nullius, misapplied (...)
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  • ‘In Defence of Sententialism’.Giulia Felappi - 2014 - Dialectica 68 (4):581-603.
    Propositional attitude sentences, such as (1) Pierre believes that snow is white, have proved to be formidably difficult to account for in a semantic theory. It is generally agreed that the that-clause ‘that snow is white’ purports to refer to the proposition that snow is white, but no agreement has been reached on what this proposition is. Sententialism is a semantic theory which tries to undermine the very enterprise of understanding what proposition is referred to in (1): according to sententialists, (...)
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  • An Epistemological Plea for Methodological Individualism and Rational Choice Theory in Cognitive Rhetoric.Alban Bouvier - 2002 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (1):51-70.
    Some current attempts to go beyond the narrow scope of rational choice theory (RCT) in the social sciences and the artificial reconstructions it sometimes provides focus on the arguments that people give to justify their beliefs and behaviors themselves. But the available argumentation theories are not constructed to fill this gap. This article argues that relevance theory, on the contrary, suggests interesting tracks. This provocative idea requires a rereading of Sperber and Wilson's theory. Actually, the authors do not explicitly support (...)
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  • An Argumentativist Point of View in Cognitive Sociology.Alban Bouvier - 2007 - European Journal of Social Theory 10 (3):465-480.
    Methodological Individualism and Rational Choice Theory can integrate various research programmes in cognitive sociology. This article sets out two different but closely related conceptions, depending on the focus of the analysis and the goals, although both deal — to some extent — with the bridge between these levels. Raymond Boudon's programme is relevant when the focus is the macro-sociological level but can be considered as weakly `cognitive'. Alban Bouvier presents a slightly stronger cognitive programme — the argumentativist programme — that (...)
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  • Anthropologists as Cognitive Scientists.Rita Astuti & Maurice Bloch - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):453-461.
    Anthropology combines two quite different enterprises: the ethnographic study of particular people in particular places and the theorizing about the human species. As such, anthropology is part of cognitive science in that it contributes to the unitary theoretical aim of understanding and explaining the behavior of the animal species Homo sapiens. This article draws on our own research experience to illustrate that cooperation between anthropology and the other sub-disciplines of cognitive science is possible and fruitful, but it must proceed from (...)
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  • Complex Concepts.Janet Dixon Keller & F. K. Lehman - 1991 - Cognitive Science 15 (2):271-291.
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  • The Anthropology of Misfortune and Cognitive Science. Examples From the Ivory Coast Senufo.Nicole Alice Sindzingre - 1995 - Science in Context 8 (3):509-529.
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  • Debunking Arguments and the Genealogy of Religion and Morality.Kelby Mason - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (9):770-778.
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  • The Relevance of Relevance for Fiction.Anne Reboul - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):729.
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  • Delusion as a Folk Psychological Kind.José Eduardo Porcher - 2016 - Filosofia Unisinos 17 (2):212-226.
    In this paper I discuss the scientific respectability of delusion as a psychiatric category. First, I present the essentialist objection to the natural kindhood of psychiatric categories, as well as non-essentialism about natural kinds as a response to that objection. Second, I present a nuanced classification of kinds of kinds. Third, drawing on the claim that the attribution of delusion relies on a folk psychological underpinning, I present the mind-dependence objection to the natural kind status of delusion. Finally, I argue (...)
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  • Cephalic Organization: Animacy and Agency.Jay Schulkin - 2008 - Contemporary Pragmatism 5 (1):61-77.
    Humans come prepared to recognize two fundamental features of our surroundings: animate objects and agents. This recognition begins early in ontogeny and pervades our ecological and social space. This cognitive capacity reveals an important adaptation and sets the conditions for pervasive shared experiences. One feature of our species and our evolved cephalic substrates is that we are prepared to recognize self-propelled action in others. Our cultural evolution is knotted to an expanding sense of shared experiences.
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  • Cognitive Adaptation: Insights From a Pragmatist Perspective.Jay Schulkin - 2008 - Contemporary Pragmatism 5 (1):39-59.
    Classical pragmatism construed mind as an adaptive organ rooted in biology; biology was not one side and culture on the other. The cognitive systems underlie adaptation in response to the precarious and in the search for the stable and more secure that result in diverse forms of inquiry. Cognitive systems are rooted in action, and classical pragmatism knotted our sense of ourselves in response to nature and our cultural evolution. Cognitive systems should be demythologized away from Cartesian detachment, and towards (...)
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  • What Makes Human Differences Into Cultural Differences.Harry van den Bouwhuijsen - 1995 - Philosophica 55.
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  • Experiment as a Second-Order Concept.Yehuda Elkana - 1988 - Science in Context 2 (1):177-196.
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  • On Interpreting “Interpretive Use”.N. V. Smith - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):734.
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  • The Information Needed for Inference.Carlota S. Smith - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):733.
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  • Rationality as an Explanation of Language?Stuart J. Russell - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):730.
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  • Presumptions of Relevance.Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):736.
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  • How Relevant?Pieter A. M. Seuren - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):731.
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  • Metaphor, Relevance and the 'Emergent Property' Issue.Deirdre Wilson & Robyn Carston - 2006 - Mind and Language 21 (3):404–433.
    The interpretation of metaphorical utterances often results in the attribution of emergent properties, which are neither standardly associated with the individual constituents in isolation nor derivable by standard rules of semantic composition. An adequate pragmatic account of metaphor interpretation must explain how these properties are derived. Using the framework of relevance theory, we propose a wholly inferential account, and argue that the derivation of emergent properties involves no special interpretive mechanisms not required for the interpretation of ordinary, literal utterances.
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  • Relevance Must Be to Someone.Yorick Wilks - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):735.
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  • Literalness and Other Pragmatic Principles.François Recanati - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):729-730.
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  • Inference and Information.Philip Pettit - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):727.
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