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Hobbes's Biblical Beasts

Political Theory 23 (2):353-375 (1995)

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  1. Deception, Politics and Aesthetics: The Importance of Hobbes’s Concept of Metaphor.Johan Tralau - 2014 - Contemporary Political Theory 13 (2):112-129.
    In recent years, we have witnessed renewed interest in metaphors in political theory. In this context, Hobbes’s theory of metaphor is of great importance as it helps us understand aesthetic qualities in theory and politics. This article argues that in the work of Hobbes – often portrayed as hostile to the use of metaphor, especially so by himself – there is a remarkable discrepancy between his professed enmity to metaphor and his own use of the very word ‘metaphor’. In a (...)
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  • Hobbes and Schmitt on the Name and Nature of Leviathan Revisited.Patricia Springborg - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (2-3):297-315.
    Hobbes's Leviathan transformed forever the meaning of the term, long debated by Biblical commentators. Alternatively, in the Book of Job chapter 41, a great chthonic beast, or Lucifer?like ?King of all the Children of Pride?, Leviathan for Hobbes was a figure for the modern state. Recent work by Quentin Skinner and Noel Malcolm treats Leviathan as in part a story about representation. But by juxtaposing the thesis of Carl Schmitt, juridical architect of the Third Reich, and author if his own (...)
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  • Schmitt's Behemoth.Tomaž Mastnak - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (2-3):275-296.
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  • Meanings and Contexts: Mr Skinner's Hobbes and the English Mode of Political Theory.Ted Miller & Tracy B. Strong - 1997 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 40 (3):323 – 355.
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  • Producing Islamic Philosophy: The Life and Afterlives of Ibn Ṭufayl’s Ḥayy Ibn Yaqẓān in Global History, 1882–1947.Murad Idris - 2016 - European Journal of Political Theory 15 (4):382-403.
    In recent decades, the trope that classical Muslim thinkers anticipated or influenced modern European thought has provided an easy endorsement of their contemporary relevance. This article studies how Arab editors and intellectuals, from 1882 to 1947, understood the twelfth-century Andalusian philosopher Ibn Ṭufayl, and Arabo-Islamic philosophy generally. This modern generation of Arab scholars also attached significance to classical Arabic texts as precursors to modern European thought. They invited readers to retrospectively identify with Ibn Ṭufayl and his treatise, Ḥayy ibn Yaqẓān. (...)
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