Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Distorting Concepts, Obscured Experiences: Hermeneutical Injustice in Religious Trauma and Spiritual Violence.Michelle Panchuk - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (4):607-625.
    This article explores the relationship between hermeneutical injustice in religious settings and religious trauma and spiritual violence. In it I characterize a form of hermeneutical injustice that arises when experiences are obscured from collective understanding by normatively laden concepts, and I argue that this form of HI often plays a central role in cases of religious trauma and spiritual violence, even those involving children. In section I, I introduce the reader to the phenomena of religious trauma and spiritual violence. In (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Responsible Agency and the Importance of Moral Audience.Anneli Jefferson & Katrina Sifferd - 2023 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 26 (3):361-375.
    Ecological accounts of responsible agency claim that moral feedback is essential to the reasons-responsiveness of agents. In this paper, we discuss McGeer’s scaffolded reasons-responsiveness account in the light of two concerns. The first is that some agents may be less attuned to feedback from their social environment but are nevertheless morally responsible agents – for example, autistic people. The second is that moral audiences can actually work to undermine reasons-responsiveness if they espouse the wrong values. We argue that McGeer’s account (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Neurotechnology ethics and relational agency.Sara Goering, Timothy Brown & Eran Klein - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (4):e12734.
    Novel neurotechnologies, like deep brain stimulation and brain‐computer interface, offer great hope for treating, curing, and preventing disease, but raise important questions about effects these devices may have on human identity, authenticity, and autonomy. After briefly assessing recent narrative work in these areas, we show that agency is a phenomenon key to all three goods and highlight the ways in which neural devices can help to draw attention to the relational nature of our agency. Drawing on insights from disability theory, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Disability and Social Epistemology.Joel Michael Reynolds & Kevin Timpe - 2024 - In Jennifer Lackey & Aidan McGlynn (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Social Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter canvases a number of ways that issues surrounding disability intersect with social epistemology. We begin with a discussion of how social epistemology as a field and debates concerning epistemic injustice in particular would benefit from further (a) engaging the fields of disability studies and philosophy of disability and (b) more directly addressing the problem of ableism. In section two, we turn to issues of testimony, “intuitive horribleness,” and their relationship to debates concerning disability and well-being. We address how (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark