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Foucault, governmentality, and critical disability theory: An introduction

In Foucault and the Government of Disability. University of Michigan Press. pp. 1--24 (2005)

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  1. Eugenics and the Genetic Challenge, Again: All Dressed Up and Just Everywhere to Go.Tom Koch - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (2):191-203.
    Dashiell Hammett’s reaction was “sharp and angry, snarling” when he read, at her request, a work in progress by his friend and lover, Lillian Hellman. “He spoke as if I had betrayed him.” His judgment was absolute and his advice unsparing: “Tear this up and throw it away. It’s worse than bad—it’s half good.” That is exactly what I thought of Matti Häyry’s Rationality and the Genetic Challenge as, for the third time in the evening, I penned a note in (...)
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  • Manufacturing Disability: HIV, Women and the Construction of Difference: Original Article.Marilou Gagnon - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (1):42-52.
    In 1998, the US Supreme Court first held that asymptomatic HIV infection constituted a disability when it ruled on the case of Bragdon v. Abbott. The use of yet another label to identify women living with HIV has been rarely questioned. While we do value the use of this label as an anti-discriminatory strategy, we believe that there is a need to examine how language and more specifically, the use of words such as disability, limitation, and impairment may create new (...)
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  • Reproductive Freedom, Self-Regulation, and the Government of Impairment in Utero.Shelley Tremain - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):35-53.
    : This article critically examines the constitution of impairment in prenatal testing and screening practices and various discourses that surround these technologies. While technologies to test and screen prenatally are claimed to enhance women's capacity to be self-determining, make informed reproductive choices, and, in effect, wrest control of their bodies from a patriarchal medical establishment, I contend that this emerging relation between pregnant women and reproductive technologies is a new strategy of a form of power that began to emerge in (...)
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  • Introduction: Rethinking Philosophical Presumptions in Light of Cognitive Disability.Licia Carlson & Eva Feder Kittay - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):307-330.
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  • ‘Self-Care Without a Self’: Alzheimer’s Disease and the Concept of Personal Responsibility for Health. [REVIEW]Ursula Naue - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):315-324.
    The article focuses on the impact of the concept of self-care on persons who are understood as incapable of self-care due to their physical and/or mental ‘incapacity’. The article challenges the idea of this health care concept as empowerment and highlights the difficulties for persons who do not fit into this concept. To exemplify this, the self-care concept is discussed with regard to persons with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the case of persons with AD, self-care is interpreted in many different (...)
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  • Biopower, Styles of Reasoning, and What's Still Missing From the Stem Cell Debates.Shelley Tremain - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (3):577 - 609.
    Until now, philosophical debate about human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research has largely been limited to its ethical dimensions and implications. Although the importance and urgency of these ethical debates should not be underestimated, the almost undivided attention that mainstream and feminist philosophers have paid to the ethical dimensions of hESC research suggests that the only philosophically interesting questions and concerns about it are by and large ethical in nature. My argument goes some distance to challenge the assumption that ethical (...)
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  • Intra-Feminist Critique: Modes of Disengagement.Marilyn Frye - 2001 - American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy (2):85-87.
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  • The Production of Acquiescence in the Courtroom: An Analysis of the Experiences of People with Learning Difficulties and Mental Health Conditions in UK Courts.Rosalee Dorfman - 2011 - Polis (Misc) 6:2012.
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  • The Biopolitics of Bioethics and Disability.Shelley Tremain - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2-3):101-106.
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  • Professionalism: An Archaeology.Tom Koch - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (3):219-232.
    For more than two decades, classes on “professionalism” have been the dominant platform for the non-technical socialization of medical students. It thus subsumes elements of previous foundation courses in bioethics and “medicine and society” in defining the appropriate relation between practitioners, patients, and society-at-large. Despite its importance, there is, however, no clear definition of what “professionalism” entails or the manner in which it serves various purported goals. This essay reviews, first, the historical role of the vocational practitioner in society, and (...)
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  • Disability as Abject: Kristeva, Disability, and Resistance.Josh Dohmen - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (4):762-778.
    In this essay, I develop an account of disability exclusion that, though inspired by Julia Kristeva, diverges from her account in several important ways. I first offer a brief interpretation of Kristeva's essays “Liberty, Equality, Fraternity and … Vulnerability” and “A Tragedy and a Dream: Disability Revisited” and, using this interpretation, I assess certain criticisms of Kristeva's position made by Jan Grue in his “Rhetorics of Difference: Julia Kristeva and Disability.” I then argue that Kristeva's concept of abjection, especially as (...)
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  • Minding Theory of Mind.Melanie Yergeau & Bryce Huebner - 2017 - Journal of Social Philosophy 48 (3):273-296.
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  • Inclusion and Homophily: An Argument About Participatory Decision-Making and Democratic School Management.George Koutsouris - 2014 - British Journal of Educational Studies 62 (4):413-430.
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  • What Contemporary Models of Disability Miss: The Case for a Phenomenological Hermeneutic Analysis.Chandra Kavanagh - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):63-82.
    Many commonly accepted models for understanding disability, including the medical and social models, use a vertical method in which disability is defined as a category into which people are slotted based on whether or not they fit its definitional criteria. This method, and the models of disability developed in accordance with it, inevitably homogenizes the experiences of disabled people to preserve the integrity of the definition of disability a given model provides. This adoption of a vertical method, which I call (...)
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  • What Is “NIPT”? Divergent Characterizations of Noninvasive Prenatal Testing Strategies.Meredith Vanstone, Karima Yacoub, Shawn Winsor, Mita Giacomini & Jeff Nisker - 2015 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 6 (1):54-67.
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