Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Sentimental Education: Critical Common Sense and the Social Intuitionist Model in Psychology.Kory Sorrell - 2016 - The Pluralist 11 (2):11.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Hume and Peirce on the Ultimate Stability of Belief.Ryan Pollock & David W. Agler - 2016 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2):245-269.
    Louis Loeb has argued that Hume is pessimistic while Peirce is optimistic about the attainment of fully stable beliefs. In contrast, we argue that Hume was optimistic about such attainment but only if the scope of philosophical investigation is limited to first-order explanatory questions. Further, we argue that Peirce, after reformulating the pragmatic maxim to accommodate the reality of counterfactuals, was pessimistic about such attainment. Finally, we articulate and respond to Peirce's objection that Hume's skeptical arguments in T 1.4.1 and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Passionate Reasoning as Emotional Understanding: Pragmatism and Using Emotions in Inquiry.Mara-Daria Cojocaru - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (3):609-624.
    Pragmatists have been eager to employ the method of science in philosophy, which meant, too, that they paid a great deal of attention to the attitudes that regulate the process of scientific or systematic inquiry. At the same time, they, at least in the nonstandard theories of emotion to be found in Charles Sanders Peirce and John Dewey, espoused a cognitivist view of emotion, which resonates with some of the concerns that have been at the forefront of the contemporary philosophy (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Origin and Growth of Peirce’s Ethics.Rachel Herdy - 2014 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 6 (2).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion.Richard Atkins - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    Charles Sanders Peirce is regarded as the founding father of pragmatism and a key figure in the development of American philosophy, yet his practical philosophy remains under-acknowledged and misinterpreted. In this book, Richard Atkins argues that Peirce did in fact have developed and systematic views on ethics, on religion, and on how to live, and that these views are both plausible and relevant. Drawing on a controversial lecture that Peirce delivered in 1898 and related works, he examines Peirce's theories of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • W.T. Harris, Peirce, and the Charge of Nominalism.David W. Agler & Marco Stango - 2015 - Hegel Bulletin 36 (2):135-158.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Temporal Naturalism, Free Will, and the Cartesian Myth: Time Is NOT Illusory and We Are NOT ‘Talking Heads’.Gary Goldberg - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (1):1-4.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion by Richard Kenneth Atkins. [REVIEW]Wilson Aaron - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):146-152.
    The heart of Richard Kenneth Atkins’s Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion is an interpretation and defense of Peirce’s sentimental conservatism, as well as an extension of that idea to Peirce’s philosophy of religion and to the casuistic approach to practical ethics. “A Defense of Peirce’s Sentimental Conservatism” is the explicit title of the second of the book’s six chapters. But the only chapter in which Peirce’s sentimental conservatism does not itself appear to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Peirce's Empiricism: Its Roots and its Originality.Aaron Bruce Wilson - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    This book defends an interpretation of Peirce’s philosophical work as forming a systematic whole, emphasizing his empiricist epistemology and explaining the roots of his thought in earlier empiricist and common sense philosophers. In particular, the book develops the connections between Peirce, Reid, and the British empiricists, and provides focused analyses of Peirce’s accounts of experience, habit, perception, semeiosis, truth, and ultimate ends.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations