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  1. Somatic Movement and Education: A Phenomenological Study of Young Children’s Perceptions, Expressions and Reflections of Embodiment Through Movement.Jennifer S. Leigh - unknown
    This reflexive account is of a phenomenological study that took place over two years. It explores how a group of primary-aged children perceive, express and reflect on their embodiment through movement. Children aged between four and eleven took part in sessions of yoga, somatic movement and developmental play during the school day. The data include field notes, observations, a reflexive journal, photographs of and by the children, their drawings, mark-makings, writing and posters. Children were also interviewed at the end of (...)
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  • Quo Vadis? The Capability Space and New Directions for the Philosophy of Educational Research.Caroline Sarojini Hart - 2009 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (5):391-402.
    Amartya Sen’s capability approach creates an evaluative space within which individual well-being is considered in ways that diverge from dominant utilitarian views. Instead of measuring well-being based on the accumulation of wealth and resources by individuals and nations, the capability approach focuses on the opportunities an individual has to choose and pursue a life they have reason to value. The capability space is introduced with an explanation of Sen’s evaluative framework. It is claimed that conceptions of well-being are inextricably linked (...)
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  • What Do Philosophers of Education Do? An Empirical Study of Philosophy of Education Journals.Matthew J. Hayden - 2012 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (1):1-27.
    What is philosophy of education? This question has been answered in as many ways as there are those who self-identify as philosophers of education. However, the questions our field asks and the research conducted to answer them often produce papers, essays, and manuscripts that we can read, evaluate, and ponder. This paper turns to those tangible products of our scholarly activities. The titles, abstracts, and keywords from every article published from 2000 to 2010 in four journals of educational philosophy were (...)
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  • Philosophy of Education and Economics: A Case for Closer Engagement.Stephen Gough - 2009 - Philosophy of Education 43 (2):269-283.
    Relatively little contemporary philosophy of education employs economic concepts directly. Even where issues such as marketisation of education are discussed there may be little clarification of underlying concepts. The paper argues that while much contemporary economic thinking on education may be philosophically naive, it is also the case that philosophy of education can productively engage with particular economic insights and perspectives. The paper examines particular conceptualisations of ‘economics’ and ‘the market’, drawing upon these to consider aspects of an issue that (...)
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  • Authenticity-Sensitive Preferentism and Educating for Well-Being and Autonomy.Ishtiyaque Haji & Stefaan E. Cuypers - 2008 - Philosophy of Education 42 (1):85-106.
    An overarching aim of education is the promotion of children's personal well-being. Liberal educationalists also support the promotion of children's personal autonomy as a central educational aim. On some views, such as John White's, these two goals—furthering well-being and cultivating autonomy—can come apart. Our primary aim in this paper is to argue for a species of a stronger view: assuming preferentism as our axiology, we suggest that there is an essential association between the autonomy of our springs of action, such (...)
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  • Why the Aims of Education Cannot Be Settled.Atli Harðarson - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (2):223-235.
    The dominant model of curriculum design in the last century assumed that school education could be organized around aims, defined primarily in terms of students' behaviour. The credentials of this model were questioned by, among others, Lawrence Stenhouse, who pointed out that education serves purposes that cannot be stated in terms of behavioural objectives. In this article, I offer support for Stenhouse's conclusion and go beyond it, showing that if education aims at critical understanding of its own value, then it (...)
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  • Philosophy of Education and Economics: A Case for Closer Engagement.Stephen Gough - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (2):269-283.
    Relatively little contemporary philosophy of education employs economic concepts directly. Even where issues such as marketisation of education are discussed there may be little clarification of underlying concepts. The paper argues that while much contemporary economic thinking on education may be philosophically naive, it is also the case that philosophy of education can productively engage with particular economic insights and perspectives. The paper examines particular conceptualisations of 'economics' and 'the market', drawing upon these to consider aspects of an issue that (...)
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  • Authenticity-Sensitive Preferentism and Educating for Well-Being and Autonomy.Ishtiyaque Haji & Stefaan E. Cuypers - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (1):85-106.
    An overarching aim of education is the promotion of children's personal well-being. Liberal educationalists also support the promotion of children's personal autonomy as a central educational aim. On some views, such as John White's, these two goals—furthering well-being and cultivating autonomy—can come apart. Our primary aim in this paper is to argue for a species of a stronger view: assuming preferentism as our axiology, we suggest that there is an essential association between the autonomy of our springs of action, such (...)
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