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  1. The Aeolipile as Experimental Model in Early Modern Natural Philosophy.Craig Martin - 2016 - Perspectives on Science 24 (3):264-284.
    What causes winds was regarded as one of the most difficult questions of early modern natural philosophy. Vitruvius, the ancient Roman architectural author, put forth an alternative to Aristotle’s theory by likening the generation of wind to the actions of the aeolipile, which he believed made artificial winds. As Vitruvius’s work proliferated during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, numerous natural philosophers, including Descartes, used the aeolipile as a model for nature. Yet, interpretations of Vitruvius’s text and of the relation of (...)
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  • The ‘Global Phylogeny’ and its Historical Legacy: A Critical Review of a Unified Theory of Human Biological and Linguistic Co-Evolution. [REVIEW]Frank Kressing, Matthis Krischel & Heiner Fangerau - 2014 - Medicine Studies 4 (1-4):15-27.
    In a critical review of late twentieth-century gene-culture co-evolutionary models labelled as ‘global phylogeny’, the authors present evidence for the long legacy of co-evolutionary theories in European-based thinking, highlighting that ideas of social and cultural evolution preceded the idea of biological evolution, linguistics played a dominant role in the formation of a unified theory of human co-evolution, and that co-evolutionary thinking was only possible due to perpetuated and renewed transdisciplinary reticulations between scholars of different disciplines—especially within the integrative framework of (...)
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  • Reworking Descartes' Mathesis Universalis. [REVIEW]Fokko Jan Dijksterhuis - 2014 - Metascience 23 (3):613-618.
    Descartes-Agonistes is the magnum opus of John Schuster, formerly of the University of New South Wales, honorary fellow at the University of Sydney. Its roots go back to the dissertation he wrote 35 years ago under Thomas Kuhn at Princeton University. As Schuster correctly remarks, some regard his dissertation as an underground classic. I count myself among them: Schuster’s work has been directional in my work on the history of early modern science. Schuster himself prefers to regard his dissertation as (...)
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  • Mathematizing Power, Formalization, and the Diagrammatical Mind Or: What Does “Computation” Mean? [REVIEW]Sybille Krämer - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (3):345-357.
    Computation and formalization are not modalities of pure abstractive operations. The essay tries to revise the assumption of the constitutive nonsensuality of the formal. The argument is that formalization is a kind of linear spatialization, which has significant visual dimensions. Thus, a connection can be discovered between visualization by figurative graphism and formalization by symbolic calculations: Both use spatial relations not only to represent but also to operate on epistemic, nonspatial, nonvisual entities. Descartes was one of the pioneers of using (...)
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