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  1. Artificial Gametes, the Unnatural and the Artefactual.Anna Smajdor, Daniela Cutas & Tuija Takala - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (6):404-408.
    In debates on the ethics of artificial gametes, concepts of naturalness have been used in a number of different ways. Some have argued that the unnaturalness of artificial gametes means that it is unacceptable to use them in fertility treatments. Others have suggested that artificial gametes are no less natural than many other tissues or processes in common medical use. We suggest that establishing the naturalness or unnaturalness of artificial gametes is unlikely to provide easy answers as to the acceptability (...)
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  • Bioethics and the Demise of the Concept of Human Dignity.David G. Kirchhoffer - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (2):141-154.
    The rise of “dignity talk” has led to the concept of human dignity being criticized in recent years. Some critics argue that human dignity must either be something we have or something we acquire. Others argue that there is no such thing as human dignity and people really mean something else when they appeal to it. Both “dignity talk” and the criticisms arise from a problematic conception of medical ethics as a legalistic, procedural techne. A retrieval of hermeneutical ethics, by (...)
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  • “Just One Animal Among Many?” Existential Phenomenology, Ethics, and Stem Cell Research.Norman K. Swazo - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (3):197-224.
    Stem cell research and associated or derivative biotechnologies are proceeding at a pace that has left bioethics behind as a discipline that is more or less reactionary to their developments. Further, much of the available ethical deliberation remains determined by the conceptual framework of late modern metaphysics and the correlative ethical theories of utilitarianism and deontology. Lacking, to any meaningful extent, is a sustained engagement with ontological and epistemological critiques, such as with “postmodern” thinking like that of Heidegger’s existential phenomenology. (...)
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  • Postmenopausal Motherhood Reloaded: Advanced Age and In Vitro Derived Gametes.Daniela Cutas & Anna Smajdor - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (2):386-402.
    In this paper we look at the implications of an emerging technology for the case in favor of, or against, postmenopausal motherhood. Technologies such as in vitro derived gametes have the potential to influence the ways in which reproductive medicine is practiced, and are already bringing new dimensions to debates in this area. We explain what in vitro derived gametes are and how their development may impact on the case of postmenopausal motherhood. We briefly review some of the concerns that (...)
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