Expertise and Conspiracy Theories

Social Epistemology 32 (3):196-208 (2018)
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Abstract
Judging the warrant of conspiracy theories can be difficult, and often we rely upon what the experts tell us when it comes to assessing whether particular conspiracy theories ought to be believed. However, whereas there are recognised experts in the sciences, I argue that only are is no such associated expertise when it comes to the things we call `conspiracy theories,' but that the conspiracy theorist has good reason to be suspicious of the role of expert endorsements when it comes to conspiracy theories and their rivals. The kind of expertise, then, we might associate with conspiracy theories is largely improvised—in that it lacks institutional features—and, I argue, ideally the product of a community of inquiry.
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2018
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Archival date: 2018-03-14
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References found in this work BETA
Vice Epistemology.Cassam, Quassim
Analytic Thinking Reduces Belief in Conspiracy Theories.Swami, Viren; Voracek, Martin; Stieger, Stefan; Tran, Ulrich S. & Furnham, Adrian
Secrecy and Conspiracy.Dentith, Matthew R. X. & Orr, Martin

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2018-03-12

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