Truth as the aim of epistemic justification

In Timothy Chan (ed.), The Aim of Belief. Oxford University Press (2013)
Download Edit this record How to cite View on PhilPapers
Abstract
A popular account of epistemic justification holds that justification, in essence, aims at truth. An influential objection against this account points out that it is committed to holding that only true beliefs could be justified, which most epistemologists regard as sufficient reason to reject the account. In this paper I defend the view that epistemic justification aims at truth, not by denying that it is committed to epistemic justification being factive, but by showing that, when we focus on the relevant sense of ‘justification’, it isn’t in fact possible for a belief to be at once justified and false. To this end, I consider and reject three popular intuitions speaking in favor of the possibility of justified false beliefs, and show that a factive account of epistemic justification is less detrimental to our normal belief forming practices than often supposed.
PhilPapers/Archive ID
STETAT-9
Revision history
Archival date: 2015-11-21
View upload history
References found in this work BETA
What Else Justification Could Be.Martin Smith - 2010 - Noûs 44 (1):10 - 31.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA
Stop Making Sense? On a Puzzle About Rationality.Clayton Littlejohn - 2018 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research:257-272.

Add more citations

Added to PP index
2012-11-23

Total views
823 ( #2,062 of 37,949 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
68 ( #5,218 of 37,949 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Monthly downloads since first upload
This graph includes both downloads from PhilArchive and clicks to external links.