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  1. The Doctrine of the Imitation of God in Plato. [REVIEW]P. O. K. & Culbert Gerow Rutenber - 1949 - Journal of Philosophy 46 (26):873.
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  • Plato's Theory of Human Good in the Philebus.John M. Cooper - 1999 - In Gail Fine (ed.), Plato 2: Ethics, Politics, Religion, and the Soul. Oxford University Press.
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  • Plato's Cretan City: A Historical Interpretation of the Laws.Glenn R. Morrow - 1960 - Princeton University Press.
    Plato's Cretan City is a thorough investigation into the roots of Plato's Laws and a compelling explication of his ideas on legislation and social institutions. A dialogue among three travelers, the Laws proposes a detailed plan for administering a new colony on the island of Crete. In examining this dialogue, Glenn Morrow describes the contemporary Greek institutions in Athens, Crete, and Sparta on which Plato based his model city, and explores the philosopher's proposed regulations concerning property, the family, government, and (...)
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  • Aristotle and Plato on God as Nous and as the Good.Stephen Menn - 1992 - Review of Metaphysics 45 (3):543 - 573.
    ARISTOTLE PRESENTS HIS DOCTRINE OF GOD as the first unmoved mover as the crown of his metaphysics, and thus of his entire theoretical philosophy. He obviously considers it an important achievement. Yet the doctrine has been peculiarly resistant to interpretation. It is difficult to know where to break in to Aristotle's theology: certainly not with his proof that the first mover must be unmoved. The proof has clearly been developed for the sake of the conclusion and not vice versa. How (...)
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  • Plato's Theism.R. Hackforth - 1936 - Classical Quarterly 30 (1):4-9.
    In the ontology of the Philebus νοσ is the ατία τς συμμξεωσ, the cause that combines πρας with πειρον into the mixture called γνεσισ ες οσαν or γεγενημνη οσα: correspondingly in the Timaeus the Demiurge, ριστος τν ατιν, brings order into unordered chaos by ‘Forms and Numbers’. In the Philebus the Universe has a Soul, discriminated from the νος that causes it : correspondingly in the Timaeus the Demiurge devises a soul of the world, as well as its body.
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  • "Becoming Like God" in the "Timaeus" and Aristotle.David Sedley - 1997 - In T. Calvo & L. Brisson (eds.), Interpreting the Timaeus – Critias. Proceedings of the IV Symposium Platonicum. Selected papers. Sankt Augustin, Germany: Academia Verlag. pp. 327-39.
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  • Plato.Lane Cooper - 1939 - Philosophical Review 48 (6):650-651.
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  • Reason and Rotation: Circular Movement as the Model of Mind (Nous) in Later Plato.Edward N. Lee - 1976 - In W. H. Werkmeister (ed.), Facets of Plato's Philosophy. Van Gorcum. pp. 70--102.
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  • Ethics and the Divine Life in Plato's Philosophy.James Duerlinger - 1985 - Journal of Religious Ethics 13 (2):312 - 331.
    Plato's ethics, contrary to the impression recent literature on the topic creates, is basically a system of religious ethics, and I sketch here its main outlines. Since the goal of Plato's philosophy is the achievement of the divine life, his ethics in its most comprehensive sense is the knowledge that this life is our good, along with the knowledge of how our good can be achieved. With the help of passages in Plato's dialogues and other ancient sources I explain briefly (...)
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