Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. The End of the Cratylus: Limning The World.Allan Silverman - 2001 - Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):25-43.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Plato's Philosophy of Language.Raphael Demos - 1964 - Journal of Philosophy 61 (20):595-610.
    This paper is based on the "cratylus", although there is occasional reference to other dialogues. In plato's contrast between the language of the gods and the language of mortals, we may discern something like the contrast between ideal and ordinary language. By names he means terms which have both reference and sense necessarily; such terms are also verbs, for verbs are names of actions and actions are realities; for instance, a blow. The criterion for the identity of names is that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Plato on Naming.Gail Fine - 1977 - Philosophical Quarterly 27 (109):289-301.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Letters and Syllables in Plato.Gilbert Ryle - 1960 - Philosophical Review 69 (4):431-451.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • A Criticism of Plato's Cratylus.Richard Robinson - 1956 - Philosophical Review 65 (3):324-341.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • True and False Speech in Plato's "Cratylus" 385 B-C.W. M. Pfeiffer - 1972 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):87 - 104.
    In 385B-C of the Cratylus, Plato appears to be formulating a version of the correspondence theory of truth, in such a way that it applies not only to discourse, but to individual names as well. However commentators who have remarked on this passage, either take exception to the reasoning, or find it necessary to interpret the conclusion with qualifications that Plato never could have intended. Richard Robinson, for example, on p.328 of “A Criticism of Plato’s Cratylus”, sums up the argument (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Plato On Truth And Falsity In Names.J. Luce - 1969 - Classical Quarterly 19 (2):222-232.
    In Cratylus 385 b-c Plato argues that if statements () can be true or false, names (),2 as parts () of statements, are also capable of being true or false. From Aristotle onwards this view has often been challenged,3 and R. Robinson put the case against it trenchantly when he wrote:4 This argument is bad; for names have no truth-value, and the reason given for saying that they do is a fallacy of division. No one in the dialogue points out (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • A Displacement in the Text of the Cratylus.Malcolm Schofield - 1972 - Classical Quarterly 22 (02):246-253.
    In this paper I argue that the stretch of dialogue from 385 b 2–d 1 in the Cratylus does not belong where it is found in the MSS. , but fits rather between 387 c 5 and 387 c 6. I suggest further that at any rate my negative thesis receives some measure of support from the fragments of Proclus' commentary on the dialogue.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Making Sense of the Cratylus.Rudolph H. Weingartner - 1970 - Phronesis 15 (1):5-25.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • True and False Names in the "Cratylus".Mary Richardson - 1976 - Phronesis 21 (2):135-145.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Names, Forms and Conventionalism: Cratylus, 383-395.Richard J. Ketchum - 1979 - Phronesis 24 (2):133-147.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Plato on Conventionalism.Rachel Barney - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (2):143 - 162.
    A new reading of Plato's account of conventionalism about names in the Cratylus. It argues that Hermogenes' position, according to which a name is whatever anybody 'sets down' as one, does not have the counterintuitive consequences usually claimed. At the same time, Plato's treatment of conventionalism needs to be related to his treatment of formally similar positions in ethics and politics. Plato is committed to standards of objective natural correctness in all such areas, despite the problematic consequences which, as he (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • On Rational Philosophy of Language: The Programme in Plato's Cratylus Reconsidered.Kuno Lorenz & Jürgen Mittelstrass - 1967 - Mind 76 (301):1-20.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Plato On Truth And Falsity In Names.J. V. Luce - 1969 - Classical Quarterly 19 (02):222-.
    In Cratylus 385 b-c Plato argues that if statements () can be true or false, names (),2 as parts () of statements, are also capable of being true or false. From Aristotle onwards this view has often been challenged,3 and R. Robinson put the case against it trenchantly when he wrote:4 This argument is bad; for names have no truth-value, and the reason given for saying that they do is a fallacy of division. No one in the dialogue points out (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Putting the Cratylus in its Place.Mary Margaret Mackenzie - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (01):124-.
    The Cratylus begins with a paradox; it ends with a paradox; and it has a paradox in between. But this disturbing characteristic of the dialogue has been overshadowed, not to say ignored, in the literature. For commentators have seen it as their task to discover exactly what theory of language Plato himself, despite his declared perplexity, intends to adopt as he rejects the alternatives of Hermogenes and Cratylus. A common view, then, has been to suppose that the πορίαι of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • A Displacement In The Text Of The Cratylus.Malcolm Schofield - 1972 - Classical Quarterly 22 (2):246-253.
    In this paper I argue that the stretch of dialogue from 385 b 2–d 1 in the Cratylus does not belong where it is found in the MSS., but fits rather between 387 c 5 and 387 c 6. I suggest further that at any rate my negative thesis receives some measure of support from the fragments of Proclus' commentary on the dialogue.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations