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  1. Abortion and Miscarriage.Amy Berg - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (5):1217-1226.
    Opponents of abortion sometimes hold that it is impermissible because fetuses are persons from the moment of conception. But miscarriage, which ends up to 89 % of pregnancies, is much deadlier than abortion. That means that if opponents of abortion are right, then miscarriage is the biggest public-health crisis of our time. Yet they pay hardly any attention to miscarriage, especially very early miscarriage. Attempts to resolve this inconsistency by adverting to the distinction between killing and letting die or to (...)
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  • Cursed Lamp: The Problem of Spontaneous Abortion.William Simkulet - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (11):784-791.
    Many people believe human fetuses have the same moral status as adult human persons, that it is wrong to allow harm to befall things with this moral status, and thus voluntary, induced abortion is seriously morally wrong. Recently, many prochoice theorists have argued that this antiabortion stance is inconsistent; approximately 60% of human fetuses die from spontaneous abortion, far more than die from induced abortion, so if antiabortion theorists really believe that human fetuses have significant moral status, they have strong (...)
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  • The Scourge: Moral Implications of Natural Embryo Loss.Toby Ord - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):12 – 19.
    It is often claimed that from the moment of conception embryos have the same moral status as adult humans. This claim plays a central role in many arguments against abortion, in vitro fertilization, and stem cell research. In what follows, I show that this claim leads directly to an unexpected and unwelcome conclusion: that natural embryo loss is one of the greatest problems of our time and that we must do almost everything in our power to prevent it. I examine (...)
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  • Natural Embryo Loss—a Missed Opportunity.Thomas A. Marino - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):25 – 27.
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  • Within the Limits of the Defensible: A Response to Simkulet’s Argument Against the Pro-Life View on the Basis of Spontaneous Abortion.Henrik Friberg-Fernros - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (11):743-745.
    In a recent article, William Simkulet has argued against the anti-abortion view by invoking the fact that many human fetuses die from spontaneous abortion. He argues that this fact poses a dilemma for proponents of the anti-abortion view: either they must abandon their anti-abortion view or they must engage in preventing spontaneous abortion significantly more than at present—either to the extent that they try to prevent induced abortion or at least significantly more than they do today. In this reply, I (...)
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  • Precisely Which Claim Makes Spontaneous Abortion a Scourge.Russell DiSilvestro - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):31 – 33.
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  • For What We Do, and Fail to Do.Christopher Dodsworth, Tihamer Toth-Fejel & Zach Stangebye - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):29 – 31.
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  • The Subject of the Scourge: Questioning Implications From Natural Embryo Loss.Charles C. Camosy - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):20 – 21.
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  • Scouring the Scourge: Spontaneous Abortion and Morality.Robert F. Card - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):27 – 29.
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  • Natural Embryo Loss and the Moral Status of the Human Fetus.Sarah-Vaughan Brakman - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):22 – 23.
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  • Letting Nature Take its Course.Marianne Burda - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):23 – 25.
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  • Politics as Usual: What Lies Behind the Pro-Poor Rhetoric.Thomas Pogge - 2010 - Polity.
    Worldwide, human lives are rapidly improving. Education, health-care, technology, and political participation are becoming ever more universal, empowering human beings everywhere to enjoy security, economic sufficiency, equal citizenship, and a life in dignity. To be sure, there are some specially difficult areas disfavoured by climate, geography, local diseases, unenlightened cultures or political tyranny. Here progress is slow, and there may be set-backs. But the affluent states and many international organizations are working steadily to extend the blessings of modernity through trade (...)
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  • Famine, Affluence, and Morality.Peter Singer - 1972 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (3):229-243.
    As I write this, in November 1971, people are dying in East Bengal from lack of food, shelter, and medical caxc. The suffering and death that are occurring there now axe not inevitable, 1101; unavoidable in any fatalistic sense of the term. Constant poverty, a cyclone, and a civil war have turned at least nine million people into destitute refugees; nevertheless, it is not beyond Lhe capacity of the richer nations to give enough assistance to reduce any further suffering to (...)
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  • The Metaphysical Status of the Embryo: Some Arguments Revisited.David Oderberg - unknown
    abstract This paper re-examines some well-known and commonly accepted arguments for the non-individuality of the embryo, due mainly to the work of John Harris. The first concerns the alleged non-differentiation of the embryoblast from the trophoblast. The second concerns monozygotic twinning and the relevance of the primitive streak. The third concerns the totipotency of the cells of the early embryo. I argue that on a proper analysis of both the empirical facts of embryological development, and the metaphysical importance or otherwise (...)
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  • The Substance View: A Critique (Part 3).Rob Lovering - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (4):305-312.
    In my articles ‘The Substance View: A Critique’ and ‘The Substance View: A Critique,’ I raise objections to the substance view, a theory of intrinsic value and moral standing defended by a number of contemporary moral philosophers, including Robert P. George, Patrick Lee, Christopher Tollefsen, and Francis Beckwith. In part one of my critique of the substance view, I raise reductio-style objections to the substance view's conclusion that the standard human fetus has the same intrinsic value and moral standing as (...)
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  • Hit but Not Down. The Substance View in Light of the Criticism of Lovering and Simkulet.Henrik Friberg-Fernros - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (6):388-394.
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