Switch to: Citations

References in:

Everyday Attitudes About Euthanasia and the Slippery Slope Argument

In Michael Cholbi & Jukka Varelius (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Cham: Springer Verlag. pp. 145-165 (2015)

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Against the Right to Die.J. David Velleman - 1992 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (6):665-681.
    How a "right to die" may become a "coercive option".
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  • When is physician assisted suicide or euthanasia acceptable?S. Frileux - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (6):330-336.
    Objectives: To discover what factors affect lay people’s judgments of the acceptability of physician assisted suicide and euthanasia and how these factors interact.Design: Participants rated the acceptability of either physician assisted suicide or euthanasia for 72 patient vignettes with a five factor design—that is, all combinations of patient’s age ; curability of illness ; degree of suffering ; patient’s mental status , and extent of patient’s requests for the procedure .Participants: Convenience sample of 66 young adults, 62 middle aged adults, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Death in Our Life.Joseph Raz - 2013 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):1-11.
    This paper examines a central aspect of the relations between duration and quality of life by considering the moral right to voluntary euthanasia, and some aspects of the moral case for a legal right to euthanasia. Would widespread acceptance of a right to voluntary euthanasia lead to widespread changes in attitudes to life and death? Many of its advocates deny that, seeing it as a narrow right enabling people to avoid ending their life in great pain or total dependence, or (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Cancer patients' attitudes towards euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: The influence of question wording and patients' own definitions on responses. [REVIEW]Lynne Parkinson, Katherine Rainbird, Ian Kerridge, Gregory Carter, John Cavenagh, John McPhee & Peter Ravenscroft - 2005 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (2):82-89.
    Objectives: The aims of this study were to: (1) investigate patients’ views on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS), and (2) examine the impact of question wording and patients’ own definitions on their responses. Design: Cross-sectional survey of consecutive patients with cancer. Setting: Newcastle (Australia) Mater Hospital Outpatients Clinic. Participants: Patients over 18 years of age, attending the clinic for follow-up consultation or treatment by a medical oncologist, radiation oncologist or haematologist. Main Outcome Measures: Face-to-face patient interviews were conducted examining attitudes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Assisted suicide and the killing of people? Maybe. Physician-assisted suicide and the killing of patients? No: the rejection of Shaw's new perspective on euthanasia.H. V. McLachlan - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):306-309.
    David Shaw presents a new argument to support the old claim that there is not a significant moral difference between killing and letting die and, by implication, between active and passive euthanasia. He concludes that doctors should not make a distinction between them. However, whether or not killing and letting die are morally equivalent is not as important a question as he suggests. One can justify legal distinctions on non-moral grounds. One might oppose physician- assisted suicide and active euthanasia when (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • The Empirical Slippery Slope from Voluntary to Non-Voluntary Euthanasia.Penney Lewis - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (1):197-210.
    This article examines the evidence for the empirical argument that there is a slippery slope between the legalization of voluntary and non-voluntary euthanasia. The main source of evidence in relation to this argument comes from the Netherlands. The argument is only effective against legalization if it is legalization which causes the slippery slope. Moreover, it is only effective if it is used comparatively-to show that the slope is more slippery in jurisdictions which have legalized voluntary euthanasia than it is in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • The Empirical Slippery Slope from Voluntary to Non-Voluntary Euthanasia.Penney Lewis - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (1):197-210.
    Slippery slope arguments appear regularly whenever morally contested social change is proposed. Such arguments assume that all or some consequences which could possibly flow from permitting a particular practice are morally unacceptable.Typically, “slippery slope” arguments claim that endorsing some premise, doing some action or adopting some policy will lead to some definite outcome that is generally judged to be wrong or bad. The “slope” is “slippery” because there are claimed to be no plausible halting points between the initial commitment to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Attitudes toward euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: a study of the multivariate effects of healthcare training, patient characteristics, religion and locus of control.Carrie-Anne Marie Hains & Nicholas J. Hulbert-Williams - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (11):713-716.
    Next SectionPublic and healthcare professionals differ in their attitudes towards euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS), the legal status of which is currently in the spotlight in the UK. In addition to medical training and experience, religiosity, locus of control and patient characteristics (eg, patient age, pain levels, number of euthanasia requests) are known influencing factors. Previous research tends toward basic designs reporting on attitudes in the context of just one or two potentially influencing factors; we aimed to test the comparative (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Mapping the moral domain.Jesse Graham, Brian A. Nosek, Jonathan Haidt, Ravi Iyer, Spassena Koleva & Peter H. Ditto - 2011 - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 101 (2):366-385.
    The moral domain is broader than the empathy and justice concerns assessed by existing measures of moral competence, and it is not just a subset of the values assessed by value inventories. To fill the need for reliable and theoretically grounded measurement of the full range of moral concerns, we developed the Moral Foundations Questionnaire on the basis of a theoretical model of 5 universally available sets of moral intuitions: Harm/Care, Fairness/Reciprocity, Ingroup/Loyalty, Authority/Respect, and Purity/Sanctity. We present evidence for the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   218 citations  
  • A very brief measure of the Big-Five personality domains.Samuel D. Gosling, Peter J. Rentfrow & William B. Swann Jr - 2003 - Journal of Research in Personality 37 (6):504-528.
    When time is limited, researchers may be faced with the choice of using an extremely brief measure of the Big-Five personality dimensions or using no measure at all. To meet the need for a very brief measure, 5 and 10-item inventories were developed and evaluated. Although somewhat inferior to standard multi-item instruments, the instruments reached adequate levels in terms of: convergence with widely used Big-Five measures in self, observer, and peer reports, test–retest reliability, patterns of predicted external correlates, and convergence (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   167 citations  
  • Voluntary active euthanasia.Dan W. Brock - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (2):10-22.
    This article references the following linked citations. If you are trying to access articles from an off-campus location, you may be required to first logon via your library web site to access JSTOR. Please visit your library's website or contact a librarian to learn about options for remote access to JSTOR.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   80 citations  
  • The right to die as the triumph of autonomy.Tom Beauchamp - 2006 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):643 – 654.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Ending Life: Ethics and the Way We Die.Margaret Pabst Battin - 2005 - New York, US: Oxford University Press USA.
    Margaret Pabst Battin has established a reputation as one of the top philosophers working in bioethics today. This work is a sequel to Battin's 1994 volume The Least Worst Death. The last ten years have seen fast-moving developments in end-of-life issues, from the legalization of physician-assisted suicide in Oregon and the Netherlands, to a furor over proposed restrictions of scheduled drugs used for causing death, and the development of "NuTech" methods of assistance in dying. Battin's new collection covers a remarkably (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations