Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Interpreting Kant’s Critiques.Karl Ameriks - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    Karl Ameriks here collects his most important essays to provide a uniquely detailed and up-to-date analysis of Kant's main arguments in all three major areas of his work: theoretical philosophy (Critique of Pure Reason), practical philosophy (Critique of Practical Reason), and aesthetics (Critique of Judgment). Guiding the volume is Ameriks's belief that one cannot properly understand any one of these Critiques except in the context of the other two. The essays can be read individually, but read together they offer a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • Agency and Autonomy in Kant's Moral Theory: Selected Essays.Andrews Reath - 2006 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Andrews Reath presents a selection of his best essays on various features of Kant's moral psychology and moral theory, with particular emphasis on his conception of rational agency and his conception of autonomy. Together the essays articulate Reath's original approach to Kant's views about human autonomy, which explains Kant's belief that objective moral requirements are based on principles we choose for ourselves. With two new papers, and revised versions of several others, the volume will be of great interest to all (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • The Value of Humanity in Kant's Moral Theory.Richard Dean - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    The humanity formulation of Kant's Categorical Imperative demands that we treat humanity as an end in itself. Because this principle resonates with currently influential ideals of human rights and dignity, contemporary readers often find it compelling, even if the rest of Kant's moral philosophy leaves them cold. Moreover, some prominent specialists in Kant's ethics have recently turned to the humanity formulation as the most theoretically central and promising principle of Kant's ethics. Nevertheless, it has received less attention than many other (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Self-Constitution: Agency, Identity, and Integrity.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Agency and identity -- Necessitation -- Acts and actions -- Aristotle and Kant -- Agency and practical identity -- The metaphysics of normativity -- Constitutive standards -- The constitution of life -- In defense of teleology -- The paradox of self-constitution -- Formal and substantive principles of reason -- Formal versus substantive -- Testing versus weighing -- Maximizing and prudence -- Practical reason and the unity of the will -- The empiricist account of normativity -- The rationalist account of normativity (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   241 citations  
  • The Practice of Moral Judgment.Thomas E. Hill - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):47.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   85 citations  
  • The Persistence of Subjectivity: On the Kantian Aftermath.Robert B. Louden - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (226):137-139.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Creating the Kingdom of Ends.James Lenman - 1996 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (4):487-488.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   164 citations  
  • Creating the Kingdom of Ends.Allen W. Wood - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (4):607.
    This book follows hard upon Korsgaard's The Sources of Normativity. Both present the author's influential version of a Kantian theory of normative ethics and metaethics. Whereas The Sources of Normativity was a systematic investigation of "normativity" written as a single unit, the present volume is a collection of previously published papers, some of them already well known and much discussed, dating between 1983 and 1993. By the nature of the case, one might expect less thematic unity in this book than (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   159 citations  
  • Kantian Constructivism in Ethics.Thomas E. Hill Jr - 1989 - Ethics 99 (4):752-770.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Ethics, Inventing Right and Wrong.[author unknown] - 1977 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 43 (3):581-582.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   225 citations  
  • The Practice of Moral Judgment.Barbara Herman - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (8):414-436.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   150 citations  
  • Contractarian Constructivism.Ronald Milo - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (4):181.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Kant’s Ethical Thought. [REVIEW]Stephen Engstrom - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy 99 (3):149-152.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   99 citations  
  • Kant on the Limits of Human Evil.Paul Formosa - 2009 - Journal of Philosophical Research 34:189-214.
    Kant has often been accused of being far too “optimistic” when it comes to the extremes of evil that humans can perpetrate upon one another. In particular, Kant’s supposed claim that humans cannot choose evil qua evil has struck many people as simply false. Another problem for Kant, or perhaps the same problem in another guise, is his supposed claim that all evil is done for the sake of self-love. While self-love might be a plausible way to explain some instances (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Critique of Practical Reason.Immanuel Kant - 1788 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    With this volume, Werner Pluhar completes his work on Kant's three Critiques, an accomplishment unique among English language translators of Kant. At once accurate, fluent, and accessible, Pluhar's rendition of the Critique of Practical Reason meets the standards set in his widely respected translations of the _Critique of Judgment_ and the _Critique of Pure Reason_. Stephen Engstrom's Introduction discusses the place of the second Critique in Kant's critical philosophy, its relation to Kant's ethics, and its practical purpose and provides an (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   239 citations  
  • Rawls.Samuel Freeman - 2007 - Routledge.
    In this superb introduction, Samuel Freeman introduces and assesses the main topics of Rawls' philosophy. Starting with a brief biography and charting the influences on Rawls' early thinking, he goes on to discuss the heart of Rawls's philosophy: his principles of justice and their practical application to society. Subsequent chapters discuss Rawls's theories of liberty, political and economic justice, democratic institutions, goodness as rationality, moral psychology, political liberalism, and international justice and a concluding chapter considers Rawls' legacy. Clearly setting out (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   68 citations  
  • Kant.Paul Guyer - 2006 - Routledge.
    In this updated edition of his outstanding introduction to Kant, Paul Guyer uses Kant’s central conception of autonomy as the key to his thought. Beginning with a helpful overview of Kant’s life and times, Guyer introduces Kant’s metaphysics and epistemology, carefully explaining his arguments about the nature of space, time and experience in his most influential but difficult work, _The Critique of Pure Reason_. He offers an explanation and critique of Kant’s famous theory of transcendental idealism and shows how much (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • O'Neill and Korsgaard on the Construction of Normativity.Eric Watkins & William Fitzpatrick - 2002 - Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (2-3):349-367.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals.Immanuel Kant - 1785/2002 - Oxford University Press.
    In this classic text, Kant sets out to articulate and defend the Categorical Imperative - the fundamental principle that underlies moral reasoning - and to lay the foundation for a comprehensive account of justice and human virtues. This new edition and translation of Kant's work is designed especially for students. An extensive and comprehensive introduction explains the central concepts of Groundwork and looks at Kant's main lines of argument. Detailed notes aim to clarify Kant's thoughts and to correct some common (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   693 citations  
  • Creating the Kingdom of Ends.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    Christine Korsgaard has become one of the leading interpreters of Kant's moral philosophy. She is identified with a small group of philosophers who are intent on producing a version of Kant's moral philosophy that is at once sensitive to its historical roots while revealing its particular relevance to contemporary problems. She rejects the traditional picture of Kant's ethics as a cold vision of the moral life which emphasises duty at the expense of love and value. Rather, Kant's work is seen (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   181 citations  
  • Kant's Theory of Freedom.Henry E. Allison - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    In his new book the eminent Kant scholar Henry Allison provides an innovative and comprehensive interpretation of Kant's concept of freedom. The author analyzes the concept and discusses the role it plays in Kant's moral philosophy and psychology. He also considers in full detail the critical literature on the subject from Kant's own time to the present day. In the first part Professor Allison argues that at the centre of the Critique of Pure Reason there is the foundation for a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   83 citations  
  • The Sources of Normativity.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    Ethical concepts are, or purport to be, normative. They make claims on us: they command, oblige, recommend, or guide. Or at least when we invoke them, we make claims on one another; but where does their authority over us - or ours over one another - come from? Christine Korsgaard identifies four accounts of the source of normativity that have been advocated by modern moral philosophers: voluntarism, realism, reflective endorsement, and the appeal to autonomy. She traces their history, showing how (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   339 citations  
  • Critique of Pure Reason.Immanuel Kant - 1991 - In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Philosophy and Phenomenological Research. Blackwell. pp. 449-451.
    One of the cornerstone books of Western philosophy, Critique of Pure Reason is Kant's seminal treatise, where he seeks to define the nature of reason itself and builds his own unique system of philosophical thought with an approach known as transcendental idealism. He argues that human knowledge is limited by the capacity for perception and attempts a logical designation of two varieties of knowledge: a posteriori, the knowledge acquired through experience; and a priori, knowledge not derived through experience. This accurate (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   702 citations  
  • Kantian Constructivism in Moral Theory.John Rawls - 1980 - Journal of Philosophy 77 (9):515-572.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   312 citations  
  • The Sources of Normativity.Christine Korsgaard - 1996 - Mind 106 (424):791-794.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   457 citations  
  • Kant’s Ethical Thought.Allen W. Wood - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a major new study of Kant's ethics that will transform the way students and scholars approach the subject in future. Allen Wood argues that Kant's ethical vision is grounded in the idea of the dignity of the rational nature of every human being. Undergoing both natural competitiveness and social antagonism the human species, according to Kant, develops the rational capacity to struggle against its impulses towards a human community in which the ends of all are to harmonize and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   109 citations  
  • Kant on the Radical Evil of Human Nature.Paul Formosa - 2007 - Philosophical Forum 38 (3):221–245.
    In ‘Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason’ Kant presents his thesis that human nature is ‘radically evil’. To be radically evil is to have a propensity toward moral frailty, impurity and even perversity. Kant claims that all humans are ‘by nature’ radically evil. By presenting counter-examples of moral saints, I argue that not all humans are morally corrupt, even if most are. Even so, the possibility of moral failure is central to what makes us human.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • The Construction of Social Reality.John R. Searle - 1995 - Philosophy 71 (276):313-315.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   106 citations  
  • The Construction of Social Reality.John Searle - 1995 - Free Press.
    In The Construction of Social Reality, John Searle argues that there are two kinds of facts--some that are independent of human observers, and some that require..
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   353 citations  
  • A Theory of Justice.John Rawls - unknown
    Though the revised edition of A Theory of Justice, published in 1999, is the definitive statement of Rawls's view, so much of the extensive literature on Rawls's theory refers to the first edition.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2975 citations  
  • The Metaphysics of Morals.Immanuel Kant - 1797/1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Metaphysics of Morals is Kant's major work in applied moral philosophy in which he deals with the basic principles of rights and of virtues. It comprises two parts: the 'Doctrine of Right', which deals with the rights which people have or can acquire, and the 'Doctrine of Virtue', which deals with the virtues they ought to acquire. Mary Gregor's translation, revised for publication in the Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy series, is the only complete translation of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   341 citations  
  • Ethics and the a Priori: Selected Essays on Moral Psychology and Meta-Ethics.Michael Smith - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Michael Smith has written a series of seminal essays about the nature of belief and desire, the status of normative judgment, and the relevance of the views we take on both these topics to the accounts we give of our nature as free and responsible agents. This long awaited collection comprises some of the most influential of Smith's essays. Among the topics covered are: the Humean theory of motivating reasons, the nature of normative reasons, Williams and Korsgaard on internal and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • Ethics, Inventing Right and Wrong.John L. Mackie - 1977 - Penguin Books.
    John Mackie's stimulating book is a complete and clear treatise on moral theory. His writings on normative ethics-the moral principles he recommends-offer a fresh approach on a much neglected subject, and the work as a whole is undoubtedly a major contribution to modern philosophy.The author deals first with the status of ethics, arguing that there are not objective values, that morality cannot be discovered but must be made. He examines next the content of ethics, seeing morality as a functional device, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   501 citations  
  • Kant on the Highest Moral-Physical Good: The Social Aspect of Kant's Moral Philosophy.Paul Formosa - 2010 - Kantian Review 15 (1):1-36.
    Kant identifies the “highest moral-physical good” as that combination of “good living” and “true humanity” which best harmonises in a “good meal in good company”. Why does Kant privilege the dinner party in this way? By examining Kant’s accounts of enlightenment, cosmopolitanism, love and respect, and gratitude and friendship, the answer to this question becomes clear. Kant’s moral ideal is that of an enlightened and just cosmopolitan human being who feels and acts with respect and love for all persons and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Shared Cooperative Activity.Michael E. Bratman - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (2):327-341.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   176 citations  
  • Two Construals of Scanlon’s Contractualism.Philip Pettit & T. M. Scanlon - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (3):148.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Kant’s Ethical Thought.Allen W. Wood - 1999 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 62 (4):758-759.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   63 citations  
  • The Sources of Normativity.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 49 (196):384-394.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   242 citations  
  • The Autonomy of Morality and the Morality of Autonomy.Robert Stern - 2009 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (3):395-415.
    This review article is a discussion of Charles Larmore's book The Autonomy of Morality. After presenting an outline of Larmore's position, it focuses on three critical issues: whether Larmore is right to see Kant as an anti-realist; whether he deals adequately with the threat to autonomy posed by the apparent obligatoriness of morality; and whether he establishes that the constructivist idea of practical reason as self-legislating must really be as unconstrained and empty as he suggests.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Value of Rational Nature.Donald H. Regan - 2002 - Ethics 112 (2):267-291.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • The Public Use of Reason.Onora O'Neill - 1986 - Political Theory 14 (4):523-551.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Why Rawls Should Have Resisted the Hermeneutic Temptation.Joan Vergés-Gifra - 2006 - Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (4):584-603.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Objective and Unconditioned Value.Rae Langton - 2007 - Philosophical Review 116 (2):157-185.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  • Essays on Moral Realism.Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (ed.) - 1988 - Cornell University Press.
    Introduction The Many Moral Realisms Geoffrey Sayre-McCord I. Introduction Recognizing the startling resurgence in realism, ...
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  • Constructivism VS. Contractualism.Onora O'Neill - 2003 - Ratio 16 (4):319–331.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • The Practical Turn in Ethical Theory: Korsgaard’s Constructivism, Realism, and the Nature of Normativity.William J. FitzPatrick - 2005 - Ethics 115 (4):651-691.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  • Realism and Constructivism in Twentieth-Century Moral Philosophy.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2003 - Journal of Philosophical Research 28 (Supplement):99-122.
    In this paper I trace the development of one of the central debates of late twentieth-century moral philosophy—the debate between realism and what Rawls called “constructivism.” Realism, I argue, is a reactive position that arises in response to almost every attempt to give a substantive explanation of morality. It results from the realist’s belief that such explanations inevitably reduce moral phenomena to natural phenomena. I trace this belief, and the essence of realism, to a view about the nature of concepts—that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations  
  • Why Rawls Should Have Resisted the Hermeneutic Temptation.Joan Vergés-Gifra - 2006 - Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (4):584–603.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Political Liberalism.John Rawls - 1993 - Columbia University Press.
    This book continues and revises the ideas of justice as fairness that John Rawls presented in _A Theory of Justice_ but changes its philosophical interpretation in a fundamental way. That previous work assumed what Rawls calls a "well-ordered society," one that is stable and relatively homogenous in its basic moral beliefs and in which there is broad agreement about what constitutes the good life. Yet in modern democratic society a plurality of incompatible and irreconcilable doctrines--religious, philosophical, and moral--coexist within the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   579 citations  
  • The Persistence of Subjectivity: On the Kantian Aftermath.Robert B. Pippin - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Persistence of Subjectivity examines several approaches to, and critiques of, the core notion in the self-understanding and legitimation of the modern, 'bourgeois' form of life: the free, reflective, self-determining subject. Since it is a relatively recent historical development that human beings think of themselves as individual centers of agency, and that one's entitlement to such a self-determining life is absolutely valuable, the issue at stake also involves the question of the historical location of philosophy. What might it mean to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations