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  1. The Constitution of Selves.Christopher Williams & Marya Schechtman - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (4):641.
    Can we understand what makes someone the same person without understanding what it is to be a person? Prereflectively we might not think so, but philosophers often accord these questions separate treatments, with personal-identity theorists claiming the first question and free-will theorists the second. Yet much of what is of interest to a person—the possibility of survival over time, compensation for past hardships, concern for future projects, or moral responsibility—is not obviously intelligible from the perspective of either question alone. Marya (...)
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  • Consequences of Compassion:An Interpretation and Defense of Buddhist Ethics: An Interpretation and Defense of Buddhist Ethics.Charles Goodman - 2009 - Oup Usa.
    This book examines the theoretical structure of Buddhist accounts of morality, defends them against objections, and discusses their implications for free will, the justification of punishment, and other issues.
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  • The Constitution of Selves.Marya Schechtman (ed.) - 1996 - Cornell University Press.
    Marya Schechtman takes issue with analytic philosophy's emphasis on the first sort of question to the exclusion of the second.
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  • Processes, Continuants, and Individuals.Helen Steward - 2013 - Mind 122 (487):fzt080.
    The paper considers and opposes the view that processes are best thought of as continuants, to be differentiated from events mainly by way of the fact that the latter, but not the former, are entities with temporal parts. The motivation for the investigation, though, is not so much the defeat of what is, in any case, a rather implausible claim, as the vindication of some of the ideas and intuitions that the claim is made in order to defend — and (...)
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  • Paving the Great Way: Vasubandhu’s Unifying Buddhist Philosophy.Jonathan Gold - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Indian Buddhist philosopher Vasubandhu is known for his critical contribution to Buddhist Abhidharma thought, his turn to the Mahayana tradition, and his concise, influential Yogacara-Vijñanavada texts. _Paving the Great Way_ reveals another dimension of his legacy: his integration of several seemingly incompatible intellectual and scriptural traditions, with far-ranging consequences for the development of Buddhist epistemology and the theorization of tantra. Most scholars read Vasubandhu's texts in isolation and separate his intellectual development into distinct phases. Featuring close studies of Vasubandhu's (...)
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  • Moonpaths: Ethics and Emptiness.The Cowherds - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The Mahayana tradition in Buddhist philosophy is defined by its ethical orientation--the adoption of bodhicitta, the aspiration to attain awakening for the benefit of all sentient beings. And indeed, this tradition is known for its literature on ethics, which reflect the Madhyamaka tradition of philosophy, and emphasizes both the imperative to cultivate an attitude of universal care grounded in the realization of emptiness, impermanence, independence, and the absence of any self in persons or other phenomena.This position is morally very attractive, (...)
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  • Personal Agency: The Metaphysics of Mind and Action.E. J. Lowe - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    This theory accords to volitions the status of basic mental actions, maintaining that these are spontaneous exercises of the will--a "two-way" power which ...
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  • Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings.Jay Garfield & William Edelgass (eds.) - 2009 - Oup Usa.
    The Buddhist philosophical tradition is vast, internally diverse, and comprises texts written in a variety of canonical languages. It is hence often difficult for those with training in Western philosophy who wish to approach this tradition for the first time to know where to start, and difficult for those who wish to introduce and teach courses in Buddhist philosophy to find suitable textbooks that adequately represent the diversity of the tradition, expose students to important primary texts in reliable translations, that (...)
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  • He Who Sees Dhamma Sees Dhammas: Dhamma In Early Buddhism.Rupert Gethin - 2004 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 32 (5-6):513-542.
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  • Reason's Traces Identity and Interpretation in Indian and Tibetan Buddhist Thought.Matthew Kapstein - 2003
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  • No Self and the Phenomenology of Agency.Monima Chadha - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (2):187-205.
    The Buddhists philosophers put forward a revisionary metaphysics which lacks a “self” in order to provide an intellectually and morally preferred picture of the world. The first task in the paper is to answer the question: what is the “self” that the Buddhists are denying? To answer this question, I look at the Abhidharma arguments for the No-Self doctrine and then work back to an interpretation of the self that is the target of such a doctrine. I argue that Buddhists (...)
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  • On the Abhidharma Ontology.PaulM Williams - 1981 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 9 (3):227-257.
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  • Altruism and Reality: Studies in the Philosophy of the Bodhicaryāvatāra.Paul Williams - 1998 - Curzon Press.
    This volume brings together Paul Williams's previously published papers on the Indian and Tibetan interpretations of selected verses from the eighth and ninth chapters of the Bodhicaryavatara. In addition, there is a much longer version of the paper 'Identifying the Object of Negation', and nearly half the book consists of a wholly new essay, 'The Absence of Self and the Removal of Pain', subtitled 'How Santideva Destroyed the Bodhisattva Path'. This book will be of interest to those concerned with the (...)
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  • Personal Identity and Buddhist Philosophy: Empty Persons.Mark Siderits - 2003 - Ashgate.
    This book initiates a conversation between the two traditions showing how concepts and tools drawn from one philosophical tradition can help solve problems ...
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  • Early Buddhist Metaphysics: The Making of a Philosophical Tradition.Noa Ronkin - 2005 - London ; New Yorkroutledgecurzon.
    Early Buddhist Metaphysics provides a philosophical account of the major doctrinal shift in the history of early Theravada tradition in India: the transition from the earliest stratum of Buddhist thought to the systematic and allegedly scholastic philosophy of the Pali Abhidhamma movement. Entwining comparative philosophy and Buddhology, the author probes the Abhidhamma's metaphysical transition in terms of the Aristotelian tradition and vis-à-vis modern philosophy, exploits Western philosophical literature from Plato to contemporary texts in the fields of philosophy of mind and (...)
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  • Consequences of Compassion: An Interpretation and Defense of Buddhist Ethics.Charles Goodman - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Fundamental Buddhist teachings -- Main features of some western ethical theories -- Teravāda ethics as rule-consequentialism -- Mahāyāna ethics before Śāntideva and after -- Transcending ethics -- Buddhist ethics and the demands of consequentialism -- Buddhism on moral responsibility -- Punishment -- Objections and replies -- A Buddhist response to Kant.
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  • Motivation and Agency.Alfred R. Mele - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    What place does motivation have in the lives of intelligent agents? Mele's answer is sensitive to the concerns of philosophers of mind and moral philosophers and informed by empirical work. He offers a distinctive, comprehensive, attractive view of human agency. This book stands boldly at the intersection of philosophy of mind, moral philosophy, and metaphysics.
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  • Being Benevolence: The Social Ethics of Engaged Buddhism.Sallie B. King - 2005 - University of Hawaiì Press.
    Building from tradition -- Engaged Buddhist ethical theory -- Individual and society -- Human rights -- Nonviolence and its limits -- Justice/reconciliation.
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  • The Nature of Buddhist Ethics.Damien Keown - 1992 - St. Martin's Press.
    In this book the author considers data from both early and later schools of Buddhism in an attempt to provide an overall characterization of the structure of Buddhist ethics. The importance of ethics in the Buddha's teachings is widely acknowledged, but the pursuit of ethical ideals has up to now been widely held to be secondary to the attainment of knowledge. Drawing on the Aristotelian tradition of ethics the author argues against this intellectualization of Buddhism and in favour of a (...)
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  • Reason’s Traces: Identity and Interpretation in Indian and Tibetan Buddhist Thought.Matthew Kapstein - 2001 - Wisdom Publications.
    Reason's Traces is a collection of essays by one of the foremost authorities on Indian and Tibetan Buddhism.
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  • The Concealed Art of the Soul: Theories of Self and Practices of Truth in Indian Ethics and Epistemology.Jonardon Ganeri - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Hidden in the cave : the Upaniṣadic self -- Dangerous truths : the Buddha on silence, secrecy and snakes -- A cloak of clever words : the deconstruction of deceit in the Mahābhārata -- Words that burn : why did the Buddha say what he did? -- Words that break : can an Upaniṣad state the truth? -- The imperfect reality of persons -- Self as performance.
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  • Free Persons, Empty Selves.Karin Meyers - 2014 - In Matthew R. Dasti & Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 41.
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  • Freedom and Self-Control: Free Will in South Asian Buddhism.Karin L. Meyers - 2010 - Dissertation, The University of Chicago
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  • An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics: Foundations, Values and Issues.Peter Harvey & Mark Siderits - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):405–409.
    This systematic introduction to Buddhist ethics is aimed at anyone interested in Buddhism, including students, scholars and general readers. Peter Harvey is the author of the acclaimed Introduction to Buddhism, and his new book is written in a clear style, assuming no prior knowledge. At the same time it develops a careful, probing analysis of the nature and practical dynamics of Buddhist ethics in both its unifying themes and in the particularities of different Buddhist traditions. The book applies Buddhist ethics (...)
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  • Agency in Sāṃkhya and Yoga.Edwin F. Bryant - 2014 - In Matthew R. Dasti & Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 16.
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  • Pāṇinian Grammarians on Agency and Independence.George Cardona - 2014 - In Matthew R. Dasti & Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 85.
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  • Nyāya's Self as Agent and Knower.Matthew R. Dasti - 2014 - In Matthew R. Dasti & Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 112.
    Much of classical Hindu thought has centered on the question of self: what is it, how does it relate to various features of the world, and how may we benefit by realizing its depths? Attempting to gain a conceptual foothold on selfhood, Hindu thinkers commonly suggest that its distinctive feature is consciousness (caitanya). Well-worn metaphors compare the self to light as its awareness illumines the world of knowable objects. Consciousness becomes a touchstone to recognize the presence of a self. A (...)
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  • Does Anātman Rationally Entail Altruism? On Bodhicaryāvatāra 8: 101-103.Stephen Harris - 2011 - Journal of Buddhist Ethics 18.
    In the eighth chapter of the Bodhicaryāvatāra, the Buddhist philosopher Śāntideva has often been interpreted as offering an argument that accepting the ultimate nonexistence of the self (anātman) rationally entails a commitment to altruism, the view that one should care equally for self and others. In this essay, I consider reconstructions of Śāntideva’s argument by contemporary scholars Paul Williams, Mark Siderits and John Pettit. I argue that all of these various reconfigurations of the argument fail to be convincing. This suggests (...)
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  • What is It Like to Be a Bodhisattva? Moral Phenomenology in Íåntideva's Bodhicaryåvatåra.Jay Garfield - unknown
    Bodhicaryåvatåra was composed by the Buddhist monk scholar Íåntideva at Nalandå University in India sometime during the 8th Century CE. It stands as one the great classics of world philosophy and of Buddhist literature, and is enormously influential in Tibet, where it is regarded as the principal source for the ethical thought of Mahåyåna Buddhism. The title is variously translated, most often as A Guide to the Bodhisattva’s Way of Life or Engaging in the Bodhisattva Deeds, translations that follow the (...)
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  • Zen Awakening and Society.[author unknown] - 1999 - Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (3):507-536.
    In reviewing four works from the 1990s-monographs by Christopher Ives and Phillip Olson on Zen Buddhist ethics, Damien Keown's treatment of Indian Buddhist ethics, and an edited collection on Buddhism and human rights-this article examines recent scholarship on Zen Buddhist ethics in light of issues in Buddhist and comparative ethics. It highlights selected themes in the notional and real encounter of Zen Buddhism with Western thought and culture as presented in the reviewed works and identifies issues and problems for further (...)
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  • Compassion as a Matter of Fact: The Argument From No‐Self to Selflessness in Sāntideva's Siksāsamuccaya.Barbra Clayton - 2001 - Contemporary Buddhism 2 (1):83-97.
    (2001). Compassion as a matter of fact: The argument from no‐self to selflessness in Sāntideva's Siksāsamuccaya. Contemporary Buddhism: Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 83-97. doi: 10.1080/14639940108573740.
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  • Zen Awakening and Society.Harry Wells & Christoper Ives - 1998 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 18:235.
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  • A Solution to the Paradox of Desire in Buddhism.A. L. Herman - 1979 - Philosophy East and West 29 (1):91-94.
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  • The Use of Paradox in Uroboric Philosophies.John Visvader - 1978 - Philosophy East and West 28 (4):455-467.
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  • The Nature of Buddhist Ethics.Damien Keown - 1994 - Religious Studies 30 (2):252-254.
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  • Mādhyamikas on the Moral Benefits of a Self: Buddhist Ethics and Personhood.Leah McGarrity - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (4):1082-1118.
    Given the centrality of the Buddhist doctrine of ‘no-self’, those instances in which the Buddha does indeed seem to advocate a self have always provided significant sites of hermeneutic inquiry within the Buddhist tradition. They have necessitated a range of sophisticated exegetical tools such as the division of the Buddha’s pronouncements into those of provisional meaning and those of ultimate meaning ; the centrality of discerning the Buddha’s real, as opposed to apparent, intention ; and of course the notion of (...)
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  • Resentment and Reality: Buddhism on Moral Responsibility.Charles Goodman - 2002 - American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (4):359-372.
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  • Review: The Reality of Altruism: Reconstructing Śāntideva. [REVIEW]Mark Siderits - 2000 - Philosophy East and West 50 (3):412 - 424.
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  • There is No Paradox of Desire in Buddhism.Wayne Alt - 1980 - Philosophy East and West 30 (4):521-528.
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