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  1. A Theory of Justice.John Rawls - unknown
    Though the revised edition of A Theory of Justice, published in 1999, is the definitive statement of Rawls's view, so much of the extensive literature on Rawls's theory refers to the first edition.
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  • Justice as Fairness: A Restatement.C. L. Ten - 2003 - Mind 112 (447):563-566.
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  • A Theory of Justice: Original Edition.John Rawls - 2009 - Belknap Press.
    Though the revised edition of A Theory of Justice, published in 1999, is the definitive statement of Rawls's view, so much of the extensive literature on Rawls's theory refers to the first edition. This reissue makes the first edition once again available for scholars and serious students of Rawls's work.
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  • From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice.Allen Buchanan, Dan W. Brock, Norman Daniels & Daniel Wikler - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book, written by four internationally renowned bioethicists and first published in 2000, was the first systematic treatment of the fundamental ethical issues underlying the application of genetic technologies to human beings. Probing the implications of the remarkable advances in genetics, the authors ask how should these affect our understanding of distributive justice, equality of opportunity, the rights and obligations as parents, the meaning of disability, and the role of the concept of human nature in ethical theory and practice. The (...)
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  • Disorder as harmful dysfunction: A conceptual critique of DSM-III-R's definition of mental disorder.Jerome C. Wakefield - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (2):232-247.
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  • Just Health Care.Norman Daniels - 1985 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    How should medical services be distributed within society? Who should pay for them? Is it right that large amounts should be spent on sophisticated technology and expensive operations, or would the resources be better employed in, for instance, less costly preventive measures? These and others are the questions addreses in this book. Norman Daniels examines some of the dilemmas thrown up by conflicting demands for medical attention, and goes on to advance a theory of justice in the distribution of health (...)
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  • From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice.Allen Buchanan, Dan W. Brock, Norman Daniels & Daniel Wikler - 2000 - Philosophy 76 (297):472-475.
    This book, written by four internationally renowned bioethicists and first published in 2000, was the first systematic treatment of the fundamental ethical issues underlying the application of genetic technologies to human beings. Probing the implications of the remarkable advances in genetics, the authors ask how should these affect our understanding of distributive justice, equality of opportunity, the rights and obligations as parents, the meaning of disability, and the role of the concept of human nature in ethical theory and practice. The (...)
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  • A rebuttal on health.Christopher Boorse - 1997 - In James M. Humber & Robert F. Almeder (eds.), What Is Disease? Humana Press. pp. 1--134.
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  • 3. A Rebuttal on Functions.Christopher Boorse - 2002 - In André Ariew, Robert Cummins & Mark Perlman (eds.), Functions: New Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology and Biology. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 63.
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  • Love’s Labor: Essays on Women, Equality and Dependency.Eva Feder Kittay - 1999 - Routledge.
    Where society is viewed as an association of equal and autonomous persons, the work of caring for dependents, "love's labors", figure neither in political ...
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  • Paracetamol, poison, and polio: Why Boorse's account of function fails to distinguish health and disease.Elselijn Kingma - 2010 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (2):241-264.
    Christopher Boorse's Bio Statistical Theory (BST) defines health as the absence of disease, and disease as the adverse departure from normal species functioning. This paper presents a two-pronged problem for this account. First I demonstrate that, in order to accurately account for dynamic physiological functions, Boorse's account of normal function needs to be modified to index functions against situations. I then demonstrate that if functions are indexed against situations, the BST can no longer account for diseases that result from specific (...)
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  • Justice as fairness: a restatement.John Rawls (ed.) - 2001 - Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
    This book originated as lectures for a course on political philosophy that Rawls taught regularly at Harvard in the 1980s.
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  • An inquiry into the nature and causes of the wealth of nations.Adam Smith - unknown
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  • What is equality? Part 2: Equality of resources.Ronald Dworkin - 1981 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 10 (4):283 - 345.
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  • Against Rawlsian equality of opportunity.Richard J. Arneson - 1999 - Philosophical Studies 93 (1):77-112.
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  • Defining dysfunction: Natural selection, design, and drawing a line.Peter H. Schwartz - 2007 - Philosophy of Science 74 (3):364-385.
    Accounts of the concepts of function and dysfunction have not adequately explained what factors determine the line between low‐normal function and dysfunction. I call the challenge of doing so the line‐drawing problem. Previous approaches emphasize facts involving the action of natural selection (Wakefield 1992a, 1999a, 1999b) or the statistical distribution of levels of functioning in the current population (Boorse 1977, 1997). I point out limitations of these two approaches and present a solution to the line‐drawing problem that builds on the (...)
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  • Is there a problem with enhancement?Frances M. Kamm - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):5 – 14.
    This article examines arguments concerning enhancement of human persons recently presented by Michael Sandel (2004). In the first section, I briefly describe some of his arguments. In section two, I consider whether, as Sandel claims, the desire for mastery motivates enhancement and whether such a desire could be grounds for its impermissibility. Section three considers how Sandel draws the distinction between treatment and enhancement, and the relation to nature that he thinks each expresses. The fourth section examines Sandel's views about (...)
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  • What's wrong with health inequalities?Daniel M. Hausman - 2007 - Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (1):46–66.
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  • Justice, health, and healthcare.Norman Daniels - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (2):2 – 16.
    Healthcare (including public health) is special because it protects normal functioning, which in turn protects the range of opportunities open to individuals. I extend this account in two ways. First, since the distribution of goods other than healthcare affect population health and its distribution, I claim that Rawls's principles of justice describe a fair distribution of the social determinants of health, giving a partial account of when health inequalities are unjust. Second, I supplement a principled account of justice for health (...)
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  • The right to a decent minimum of health care.Allen E. Buchanan - 1984 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 13 (1):55-78.
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  • Health as a theoretical concept.Christopher Boorse - 1977 - Philosophy of Science 44 (4):542-573.
    This paper argues that the medical conception of health as absence of disease is a value-free theoretical notion. Its main elements are biological function and statistical normality, in contrast to various other ideas prominent in the literature on health. Apart from universal environmental injuries, diseases are internal states that depress a functional ability below species-typical levels. Health as freedom from disease is then statistical normality of function, i.e., the ability to perform all typical physiological functions with at least typical efficiency. (...)
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  • Health care and equality of opportunity.Gopal Sreenivasan - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (2):21-31.
    One widely accepted way of justifying universal access to health care is to argue that access to health care is necessary to ensure health, which is necessary to provide equality of opportunity. But the evidence on the social determinants of health undermines this argument.
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  • Love's Labor: Essays on Women, Equality, and Dependency.Carolyn McLeod & Eva Feder Kittay - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (5):44.
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  • Can An Egalitarian Justify Universal Access to Health Care?Lesley Jacobs - 1996 - Social Theory and Practice 22 (3):315-348.
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  • Just Health Care.Cheyney Ryan - 1990 - Philosophical Review 99 (2):287.
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  • Valuing Health.Daniel M. Hausman - 2006 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (3):246-274.
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  • The Morals of Markets and Related Essays.Harry Burrows Acton - 1993
    The Morals of Markets offers a philosophically and historically informed defense of a market-based form of social organization. Acton discusses the profit motive, competition, monopoly, the supposed impersonality of the marketplace, the assumed chaos of markets, self-interest, egalitarianism, central planning, and distributive justice. For all their high moral tone, Acton concludes the criticisms leveled and the political platforms proffered against free markets are full of contradictions and unanalyzed assumptions. A particular strength of Acton's book is that he is himself something (...)
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  • Can An Egalitarian Justify Universal Access to Health Care?Lesley Jacobs - 1996 - Social Theory and Practice 22 (3):315-348.
    Among political philosophers - and indeed public officials - it is generally believed that some sort of general principle of distributional equality can provide solid moral foundations for universal access to health care. In fact, this belief is so widely received that even among those who are very critical of egalitarianism, few have expressed doubts about the prospects for an egalitarian defense of universal access to health care. The purpose of this paper is to put pressure on this received view.
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  • Opportunity and health care: Criticisms and suggestions.Lawrence Stern - 1983 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (4):339-361.
    Norman Daniels' proposal to distribute health care on the basis of fair equality of opportunity is, in this writer's opinion, unworkable. His concepts of species-typical activity and normal opportunity range are unclear; so is the relationship between them. His view that justice accords disease a better claim on the health dollar than other causes of death, pain and disability, commits him unknowingly to the indefensible positions on particular sorts of health issues, such as the care of the aging and of (...)
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  • Medical progress and national health care.Loren E. Lomasky - 1981 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 10 (1):65-88.
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  • Risk Information Provided to Prospective Oocyte Donors in a Preliminary Phone Call.Andrea D. Gurmankin - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):3 – 13.
    In order to accommodate for the present shortage of oocyte donors, oocyte-donation programs place ads in college newspapers and provide large monetary compensation to encourage participation. Large compensation acts as a strong incentive for young women to undergo the potentially risky procedure of donation. In this enticing situation, it is particularly important for programs to fully inform prospective donors of the risks of the procedure so that they can accurately weigh the costs and benefits of donating. However, because oocyte-donor programs (...)
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