Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Equal Opportunity or Equal Social Outcome?Marc Fleurbaey - 1994 - Economics and Philosophy 10 (2):25-55.
    John Rawls's work (1971) has greatly contributed to rehabilitating equality as a basic social value, after decades of utilitarian hegemony,particularly in normative economics, but Rawls also emphasized that full equality of welfare is not an adequate goal either. This thesis was echoed in Dworkin's famous twin papers on equality (Dworkin 1981a,b), and it is now widely accepted that egalitarianism must be selective. The bulk of the debate on ‘Equality of What?’ thus deals with what variables ought to be submitted for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   85 citations  
  • What is Egalitarianism?Samuel Scheffler - 2003 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 31 (1):5-39.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   238 citations  
  • Why Not Socialism?Gerald Allan Cohen - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    Is socialism desirable? Is it even possible? In this concise book, one of the world's leading political philosophers presents with clarity and wit a compelling moral case for socialism and argues that the obstacles in its way are exaggerated. There are times, G. A. Cohen notes, when we all behave like socialists. On a camping trip, for example, campers wouldn't dream of charging each other to use a soccer ball or for fish that they happened to catch. Campers do not (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   114 citations  
  • Equality or Priority?Derek Parfit - 2001 - In John Harris (ed.), Bioethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 81-125.
    One of the central debates within contemporary Anglo-American political philosophy concerns how to formulate an egalitarian theory of distributive justice which gives coherent expression to egalitarian convictions and withstands the most powerful anti-egalitarian objections. This book brings together many of the key contributions to that debate by some of the world’s leading political philosophers: Richard Arneson, G.A. Cohen, Ronald Dworkin, Thomas Nagel, Derek Parfit, John Rawls, T.M. Scanlon, and Larry Temkin.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   238 citations  
  • Luck Egalitarianism.Carl Knight - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (10):924-934.
    Luck egalitarianism is a family of egalitarian theories of distributive justice that aim to counteract the distributive effects of luck. This article explains luck egalitarianism's main ideas, and the debates that have accompanied its rise to prominence. There are two main parts to the discussion. The first part sets out three key moves in the influential early statements of Dworkin, Arneson, and Cohen: the brute luck/option luck distinction, the specification of brute luck in everyday or theoretical terms and the specification (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  • Jazz Bands, Camping Trips and Decommodification: G. A. Cohen on Community.N. Vrousalis - 2012 - Socialist Studies 8 (1):141-163.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Life is not a camping trip - on the desirability of Cohenite socialism.Miriam Ronzoni - 2012 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (2):171-185.
    In Why Not Socialism?, GA Cohen defines socialism as the combined application of two moral principles: the egalitarian principle and the principle of community. The desirability of a social order organized around these two principles is illustrated by the ‘camping trip’ example. After describing the fundamental features of the camping trip scenario at reasonable length, Cohen argues that the desirability of such a social model is nearly self-explanatory, concluding therefore that the most significant challenges to socialism lie in its feasibility. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Cohen on Socialism, Equality and Community.Pablo Gilabert - 2012 - Socialist Studies 8 (1):101-121.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Justice Beyond Equality.Jonathan Quong - 2010 - Social Theory and Practice 36 (2):315-340.
    This essay reviews G.A. Cohen’s final major work, Rescuing Justice and Equality. In the book, Cohen challenges the Rawlsian account of the content and the concept of justice. This essay offers a summary of Cohen’s main arguments, and develops objections to several of those arguments, particularly Cohen’s claim that his proposed egalitarian ethos is not vulnerable to a well-known trilemma (liberty, equality, efficiency) that might be pressed against it. The essay’s final section offers critical reflections on the important differences between (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Relationships of Equality: A Camping Trip Revisited. [REVIEW]Richard W. Miller - 2010 - The Journal of Ethics 14 (3-4):231-253.
    G. A. Cohen incisively argued that our judgments of social justice should fit our convictions about how to interact with others in our personal lives. Ironically, the ordinary morality of cooperation invoked in his last book undermines his favored principle of equality, and supports John Rawls' reliance on a relevantly impartial choice promoting appropriate fundamental interests as a basis for distributive standards. His further objections to Rawls' account of distributive justice neglect the role of social relations in establishing the proper (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • What is equality? Part 2: Equality of resources.Ronald Dworkin - 1981 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 10 (4):283 - 345.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   375 citations  
  • Choice, circumstance, and the value of equality.Samuel Scheffler - 2005 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 4 (1):5-28.
    Many recent political philosophers have attempted to demonstrate that choice and responsibility can be incorporated into the framework of an egalitarian theory of distributive justice. This article argues, however, that the project of developing a responsibility-based conception of egalitarian justice is misconceived. The project represents an attempt to defuse conservative criticism of the welfare state and of egalitarian liberalism more generally. But by mimicking the conservative’s emphasis on choice and responsibility, advocates of responsibility-based egalitarianism unwittingly inherit the conservative’s unsustainable justificatory (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   85 citations  
  • Why sufficiency is not enough.Paula Casal - 2007 - Ethics 117 (2):296-326.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   185 citations  
  • Defending luck egalitarianism.Nicholas Barry - 2006 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):89–107.
    abstract This article defends luck egalitarianism as an interpretation of the egalitarian ideal against two major criticisms levelled against it by Elizabeth Anderson — that it is trapped in the distributive paradigm, and that it treats the victims of bad option luck too harshly to be considered an egalitarian theory. Against the first criticism, I argue that luck egalitarianism will condemn non‐material inequalities and injustices if an appropriate conception of well‐being is adopted. I demonstrate this by showing how the approach (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  • What is the point of equality.Elizabeth Anderson - 1999 - Ethics 109 (2):287-337.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   990 citations  
  • The Political Philosophy of G. A. Cohen.Nicholas Vrousalis - 2015 - Bloomsbury Academic.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Liberty, Equality, and Property.Andrew Williams - 2006 - In John S. Dryzek, Bonnie Honig & Anne Phillips (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Political Theory. Oxford University Press.
    This article describes the influence of under-acknowledged assumptions about property rights, akin to those more frequently associated with John Rawls' foremost libertarian critic, Robert Nozick, on the debate concerning liberty and equality. It shows that Nozick's challenge to egalitarians has played an important role in Ronald Dworkin's alternative statement of liberal egalitarianism and indirectly influenced later non-Rawlsian egalitarianisms. The article also discusses Rawls's initial formulation of the so-called luck-sharing project.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Luck Egalitarianism and Democratic Equality.Alexander Brown - 2005 - Ethical Perspectives 12 (3):293-340.
    The paper critically examines a series of objections to luck egalitarianism raised by Elizabeth Anderson in her essay “What is the Point of Equality?” According to Anderson, current egalitarian writing has come to be dominated by the distinction between choice and brute luck and that strict adherence to this distinction will mean treating some people in ways we have other egalitarian reasons not to want to treat them.A case is made for moving the debate on by adopting a pluralistic view (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Equal Opportunity or Equal Social Outcome?Marc Fleurbaey - 1995 - Economics and Philosophy 11 (1):25.
    John Rawls's work has greatly contributed to rehabilitating equality as a basic social value, after decades of utilitarian hegemony,particularly in normative economics, but Rawls also emphasized that full equality of welfare is not an adequate goal either. This thesis was echoed in Dworkin's famous twin papers on equality, and it is now widely accepted that egalitarianism must be selective. The bulk of the debate on ‘Equality of What?’ thus deals with what variables ought to be submitted for selection and how (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   98 citations