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  1. Editorial.Willem A. Landman & Udo Schüklenk - 2007 - Developing World Bioethics 7 (1):ii–ii.
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  • Unesco's Proposed Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights – a Bland Compromise1.John R. Williams - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):210-215.
    ABSTRACTThe latest draft of UNESCO's proposed Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights is a major disappointment. The committee of government ‘experts’ that produced it made sure that it would not introduce any new obligations for States, and so the document simply restates existing agreements and lists desirable goals without specifying how they can be achieved. This article focuses on the shortcomings of the document as it would apply to health care. These shortcomings are evident in the document's scope, aims (...)
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  • UNESCO 'Declares' Universals on Bioethics and Human Rights – Many Unexpected Universal Truths Unearthed by UN Body.Willem Landman & Udo Schuklenk - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):iii–vi.
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  • The Trouble with Universal Declarations.David Benatar - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):220-224.
    ABSTRACTA number of problems plague universal declarations. To the extent that those drafting and adopting the declaration represent a range of different views, consensus can only be obtained if the declaration makes minimalist claims that all can support, or makes claims that are vague enough that they can be interpreted to everybody's satisfaction. To the extent that a universal declaration avoids these problems, and takes an unequivocal and controversial stand, it does so by privileging the view that is hegemonic. After (...)
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  • The Quest for Universality: Reflections on the Universal Draft Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights.Mary C. Rawlinson & Anne Donchin - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):258–266.
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  • Human Dignity, Bioethics, and Human Rights.Matti Hayry & Tuija Takala - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):225-233.
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  • The Trouble with Universal Declarations.David Benatar - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):220–224.
    ABSTRACTA number of problems plague universal declarations. To the extent that those drafting and adopting the declaration represent a range of different views, consensus can only be obtained if the declaration makes minimalist claims that all can support, or makes claims that are vague enough that they can be interpreted to everybody's satisfaction. To the extent that a universal declaration avoids these problems, and takes an unequivocal and controversial stand, it does so by privileging the view that is hegemonic . (...)
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  • Cultural Values Embodying Universal Norms: A Critique of a Popular Assumption About Cultures and Human Rights.Nie Jing-bao - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):251–257.
    ABSTRACTIn Western and non‐Western societies, it is a widely held belief that the concept of human rights is, by and large, a Western cultural norm, often at odds with non‐Western cultures and, therefore, not applicable in non‐Western societies. The Universal Draft Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights reflects this deep‐rooted and popular assumption. By using Chinese culture as an illustration, this article points out the problems of this widespread misconception and stereotypical view of cultures and human rights. It highlights the (...)
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  • Cultural Values Embodying Universal Norms: A Critique of a Popular Assumption About Cultures and Human Rights.Nie Jing-bao - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):251-257.
    ABSTRACTIn Western and non‐Western societies, it is a widely held belief that the concept of human rights is, by and large, a Western cultural norm, often at odds with non‐Western cultures and, therefore, not applicable in non‐Western societies. The Universal Draft Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights reflects this deep‐rooted and popular assumption. By using Chinese culture as an illustration, this article points out the problems of this widespread misconception and stereotypical view of cultures and human rights. It highlights the (...)
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  • Editorial.Udo Schuklenk - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):iii–vi.
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  • Challenges of Macro-Ethics: Bioethics and the Transformation of Knowledge Production. [REVIEW]Hub Zwart - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (4):283-293.
    One interesting aspect of the Hwang-case has been the way in which this affair was assessed by academic journals such as Nature. Initially, Hwang’s success was regarded as evidence for the detrimental effects of research ethics, slowing down the pace of research in Western countries. Eventually, however, Hwang’s debacle was seen as evidence for the importance of ethics in the life sciences. Ironically, it was concluded that the West maintains its prominence in science (as a global endeavour) precisely because it (...)
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  • Global Bioethics at UNESCO: In Defence of the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights.R. Andorno - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (3):150-154.
    The Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights adopted by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation on 19 October 2005 is an important step in the search for global minimum standards in biomedical research and clinical practice. As a member of UNESCO International Bioethics Committee, I participated in the drafting of this document. Drawing on this experience, the principal features of the Declaration are outlined, before responding to two general charges that have been levelled at UNESCO’s bioethical activities (...)
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  • Sex Selection and Regulated Hatred.J. Harris - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (5):291-294.
    This paper argues that the HFEA’s recent report on sex selection abdicates its responsibility to give its own authentic advice on the matters within its remit, that it accepts arguments and conclusions that are implausible on the face of it and where they depend on empirical claims, produces no empirical evidence whatsoever, but relies on reckless speculation as to what the “facts” are likely to be. Finally, having committed itself to what I call the “democratic presumption”, that human freedom will (...)
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  • Editorial: Statements, Declarations and the Problems of Ethical Expertise.Hub Zwart - 2007 - Genomics, Society and Policy 3 (1):1-3.
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  • The Activities of UNESCO in the Area of Ethics.H. ten Have - 2006 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (4):333-351.
    : The member states of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) decided in 2002 that ethics is one of the five priority areas of the organization. This article describes three categories of past and current activities in the ethics of science and technology, in particular bioethics. The first category is the global standard setting with the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights as the most recently adopted normative instrument. The second category focuses on capacity building in (...)
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  • Gene Week: A Novel Way of Consulting the Public.Mairi Levitt, Kate Weiner & John Goodacre - 2005 - .
    Within academic circles, the “deficit” model of public understanding of science has been subject to increasing critical scrutiny by those who favor more constructivist approaches. These suggest that “the public” can articulate sophisticated ideas about the social and ethical implications of science regardless of their level of technical knowledge. The seminal studies following constructivist approaches have generally involved small-scale qualitative investigations, which have minimized the pre-framing of issues to a greater or lesser extent. This article describes the Gene Week Project, (...)
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  • The Activities of UNESCO in the Area of Ethics.Henk Ten Have - 2006 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (4):333-351.
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  • The History and Geography of Human Genes.L. Luca Cavalli-Sforza, Paoli Menozzi, Alberto Piazza & C. Stephen Downes - 1996 - Bioessays 18 (1):84-85.
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