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  1. A Plea for Complex Categories in Ontologies.Alexandra Arapinis & Laure Vieu - 2015 - Applied Ontology 10 (3-4):285-296.
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  • Causal Models: How People Think About the World and its Alternatives.Steven Sloman - 2005 - Oup Usa.
    This book offers a discussion about how people think, talk, learn, and explain things in causal terms in terms of action and manipulation. Sloman also reviews the role of causality, causal models, and intervention in the basic human cognitive functions: decision making, reasoning, judgement, categorization, inductive inference, language, and learning.
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  • On Travis Cases.Agustin Vicente - 2012 - Linguistics and Philosophy 35 (1):3-19.
    Charles Travis has been forcefully arguing that meaning does not determine truth-conditions for more than two decades now. To this end, he has devised ingenious examples whereby different utterances of the same prima facie non-ambiguous and non-indexical expression type have different truth-conditions depending on the occasion on which they are delivered. However, Travis does not argue that meaning varies with circumstances; only that truth-conditions do. He assumes that meaning is a stable feature of both words and sentences. After surveying some (...)
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  • Copredication and Property Inheritance.David Liebesman & Ofra Magidor - 2017 - Philosophical Issues 27 (1):131-166.
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  • On Referring.P. F. Strawson - 1950 - Mind 59 (235):320-344.
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  • Word Meaning, What is Said, and Explicature.Robyn Carston - 2013 - In C. Penco & F. Domaneschi (eds.), What is Said and What is Not. Stanford: Csli Publications.
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  • Language as a Natural Object.Noam Chomsky - 2000 - In New Horizons in the Study of Language and Mind. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 106--133.
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  • Meaning Before Truth.Paul M. Pietroski - 2005 - In Gerhard Preyer & Georg Peter (eds.), Contextualism in Philosophy: Knowledge, Meaning, and Truth. Oxford University Press.
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  • Lexical Meaning in Context: A Web of Words.Nicholas Asher - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about the meanings of words and how they can combine to form larger meaningful units, as well as how they can fail to combine when the ...
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  • The Green Leaves and the Expert: Polysemy and Truth-Conditional Variability.Agustin Vicente - 2015 - Lingua 157:54-65.
    Polysemy seems to be a relatively neglected phenomenon within philosophy of language as well as in many quarters in linguistic semantics. Not all variations in a word’s contribution to truth-conditional contents are to be thought as expressions of the phenomenon of polysemy, but it can be argued that many are. Polysemous terms are said to contribute senses or aspects to truth-conditional contents. In this paper, I will make use of the notion of aspect to argue that some apparently wild variations (...)
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  • The Generative Lexicon.James Pustejovsky - 1995 - MIT Press.
    The Generative Lexicon presents a novel and exciting theory of lexical semantics that addresses the problem of the "multiplicity of word meaning" - that is, how ...
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  • What Kind of Creatures Are We?Noam Chomsky - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    Noam Chomsky is widely known and deeply admired for being the founder of modern linguistics, one of the founders of the field of cognitive science, and perhaps the most avidly read political theorist and commentator of our time. In these lectures, he presents a lifetime of philosophical reflection on all three of these areas of research to which he has contributed for over half a century. In clear, precise, and non-technical language, Chomsky elaborates on fifty years of scientific development in (...)
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  • Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution.Ray Jackendoff - 2002 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Already hailed as a masterpiece, Foundations of Language offers a brilliant overhaul of the last thirty-five years of research in generative linguistics and related fields. "Few books really deserve the cliché 'this should be read by every researcher in the field'," writes Steven Pinker, author of The Language Instinct, "but Ray Jackendoff's Foundations of Language does." Foundations of Language offers a radically new understanding of how language, the brain, and perception intermesh. The book renews the promise of early generative linguistics: (...)
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  • Referring to Institutional Entities: Semantic and Ontological Perspectives.Alexandra Arapinis - 2013 - Applied Ontology 8 (1):31-57.
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  • Metaphor, Ad Hoc Concepts and Word Meaning - More Questions Than Answers.Robyn Carston - unknown
    Recent work in relevance-theoretic pragmatics develops the idea that understanding verbal utterances involves processes of ad hoc concept construction. The resulting concepts may be narrower or looser than the lexical concepts which provide the input to the process. Two of the many issues that arise are considered in this paper: (a) the applicability of the idea to the understanding of metaphor, and (b) the extent to which lexical forms are appropriately thought of as encoding concepts.
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