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  1. Effortless Action: Wu-Wei as Conceptual Metaphor and Spiritual Ideal in Early China.Edward Slingerland - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    This book presents a systematic account of the role of the personal spiritual ideal of wu-wei--literally "no doing," but better rendered as "effortless action"--in early Chinese thought. Edward Slingerland's analysis shows that wu-wei represents the most general of a set of conceptual metaphors having to do with a state of effortless ease and unself-consciousness. This concept of effortlessness, he contends, serves as a common ideal for both Daoist and Confucian thinkers. He also argues that this concept contains within itself a (...)
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  • Kant and China: Aesthetics, Race, and Nature.Eric S. Nelson - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (4):509-525.
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  • Religious Reason: The Rational and Moral Basis of Religious Belief.Ronald M. Green - 1978 - Religious Studies 17 (1):124-126.
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  • The Moral Fool: A Case for Amorality.Hans-Georg Moeller - 2009 - Columbia University Press.
    Justice, equality, and righteousness—these are some of our greatest moral convictions. Yet in times of social conflict, morals can become rigid, making religious war, ethnic cleansing, and political purges possible. Morality, therefore, can be viewed as pathology-a rhetorical, psychological, and social tool that is used and abused as a weapon. An expert on Eastern philosophies and social systems theory, Hans-Georg Moeller questions the perceived goodness of morality and those who claim morality is inherently positive. Critiquing the ethical "fanaticism" of Western (...)
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  • China, Nature, and the Sublime in Kant.Eric S. Nelson - 2010 - In Stephen R. Palmquist (ed.), Cultivating Personhood: Kant and Asian Philosophy. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 333--348.
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  • The Idea of Immortality as an Imaginative Projection of an Indefinite Moral Future.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2010 - Akten des XI. Kant-Kongresses 2:925-936.
    In his Critique of Pure Reason, Kant famously includes immortality as one of the three “ideas” that give rise to “unavoidable problems of reason” (KrV, B7)1 and thereby constitute the basic subject-matter of metaphysics. Interpreters have paid a great deal of attention to the other two ideas, God and freedom; yet very few studies of Kantian immortality have ever been undertaken. This should come as no surprise, once we realize that Kant himself used the word “immortality” and its cognates only (...)
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  • The Idea of Immortality as an Imaginative Projection of an Indefinite Moral Future.Stephen Palmquist - 2013 - In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. pp. 925-936.
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