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  1. The Incompleteness of 'Punishment as Fair Play': A Response to Dagger.Antony Duff - 2008 - Res Publica 14 (4):277-281.
    Richard Dagger (in this issue) provides perhaps the most persuasive version of a ‘fair play’ theory of criminal punishment, grounded in an attractive liberal republican political theory. But, I argue, his version of the theory still faces serious objections: that its explanation of why some central mala in se are properly criminalised is still distorting, despite his appeal to the burdens of ‘general compliance’; and that it cannot adequately explain (as it should explain) the differential seriousness and wrongfulness of different (...)
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  • Playing Fair with Punishment.Richard Dagger - 1993 - Ethics 103 (3):473-488.
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  • Some Thoughts About Retributivism.David Dolinko - 1991 - Ethics 101 (3):537-559.
    Retributive accounts of the justification of criminal punishment are increasingly fashionable, yet their proponents frequently rely more on suggestive metaphor than on reasoned explanation. This article seeks to question whether any such coherent explanations are possible. I briefly sketch some general doubts about the validity of retributivist views and then critique three recent efforts (by George Sher, Jean Hampton, and Michael Moore) to put retributivism on a sound basis.
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  • Punishment as Fair Play.Richard Dagger - 2008 - Res Publica 14 (4):259-275.
    This article defends the fair-play theory of legal punishment against three objections. The first, the irrelevance objection, is the long-standing complaint that fair play fails to capture what it is about crimes that makes criminals deserving of punishment ; the others are the recently raised false-equivalence and lacks-integration objections. In response, I sketch an account of fair-play theory that is grounded in a conception of the political order as a meta- cooperative practice—a conception that falls somewhere between contractual and communitarian (...)
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  • The Problem of Punishment.David Boonin - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, David Boonin examines the problem of punishment, and particularly the problem of explaining why it is morally permissible for the state to treat those who break the law in ways that would be wrong to treat those who do not? Boonin argues that there is no satisfactory solution to this problem and that the practice of legal punishment should therefore be abolished. Providing a detailed account of the nature of punishment and the problems that it generates, he (...)
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  • Reciprocity as a Justification for Retributivism.Jami L. Anderson - 1997 - Criminal Justice Ethics 16 (1):13-25.
    Retributivism is regarded by many as an attractive theory of punishment. Its primary assumption is that persons are morally responsible agents, and it demands that the social practices of punishment acknowledge that agency. But others have criticized retributivism as being barbaric, claiming that the theory is nothing more than a rationalization for revenge that fails to offer a compelling non-consequentialist justification for the infliction of harm. Much of the contemporary philosophical literature on retributivism has attempted to meet this criticism. One (...)
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  • Distributive Justice and the Theory of Punishment.Wojciech Sadurski - 1985 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 5 (1):47-59.
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  • Do the Guilty Deserve Punishment?Richard W. Burgh - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (4):193-210.
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  • [Book Review] Forgiveness and Mercy. [REVIEW]Jeffrie G. Murphy & Jean Hampton - 1990 - Ethics 100 (2):413-415.
    This book focuses on the degree to which certain moral and legal doctrines are rooted in specific passions that are then institutionalised in the form of criminal law. A philosophical analysis is developed of the following questions: when, if ever, should hatred be overcome by sympathy or compassion? What are forgiveness and mercy and to what degree do they require - both conceptually and morally - the overcoming of certain passions and the motivation by other passions? If forgiveness and mercy (...)
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