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  1. Advance Directives, Autonomy and Unintended Death.Jim Stone - 1994 - Bioethics 8 (3):223–246.
    Advance directives typically have two defects. First, most advance directives fail to enable people to effectively avoid unwanted medical intervention. Second, most of them have the potential of ending your life in ways you never intended, years before you had to die.
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  • Questions Remaining About the Minimally Conscious State.James L. Bernat - 2002 - Neurology 58 (3):337-338.
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  • The Minimally Conscious State: Definition and Diagnostic Criteria.Joseph T. Giacino & Childs N. Ashwal S. - 2002 - Neurology 58 (3):349-353.
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  • Persistent Vegetative State, Prospective Thinking, and Advance Directives.Thomas A. Mappes - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (2):119-139.
    : This article begins with a discussion of persistent vegetative state (PVS), focusing on concerns related to both diagnosis and prognosis and paying special attention to the 1994 Multi-Society Task Force report on the medical aspects of PVS. The article explores the impact of diagnostic and prognostic uncertainties on prospective thinking regarding the possibility of PVS and considers the closely related question of how prospective thinkers might craft advance directives in order to deal most effectively with this possibility.
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  • "The Minimally Conscious State: Definition and Diagnostic Criteria": Comments and Reply.Diane Coleman, D. Alan Shewmon & J. T. Giacino - 2002 - Neurology 58 (3):506-507.
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