Order:
See also
Alex Priou
University of Colorado, Boulder
  1. Hesiod: Man, Law and Cosmos.Alex Priou - 2014 - Polis 31 (2):233-260.
    In his two chief works, the Theogony and Works and Days, Hesiod treats the possibility of providence. In the former poem, he considers what sort of god could claim to gives human beings guidance. After arriving at Zeus as the only consistent possibility, Hesiod presents Zeus’ rule as both cosmic and legalistic. In the latter poem, how- ever, Hesiod shows that so long as Zeus is legalistic, his rule is limited cosmically to the human being. Ultimately, Zeus’ rule emerges as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. ... Going Further on Down the Road..Alex Priou - 2016 - Review of Metaphysics 70 (1):03-31.
    Praised for its reliance on observation rather than myth, the Milesian school signals the dawn of science in the West. Whereas Hesiod appeals to the long ago and far away to explain the here and now, Thales and his cohorts do the reverse. In this reversal, we are their thankful, even faithful heirs. But with Hesiod not everything is myth and hearsay. Indeed, Hesiod singles himself out by name as the bearer of a powerfully poetic and distinctly human wisdom that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. On Two Socratic Questions.Alex Priou - 2017 - The St. John's Review 58:77-91.
    The most famous Socratic question—ti esti touto?—is often pre- ceded by a far less famous, but more fundamental question—esti touto ti? Though this question is posed in many dialogues with re- spect to myriad topics, in every instance it receives but one answer: it is something, namely something that is. The dialogue devoted to why this question always meets with an affirmative answer would appear to be the Parmenides, for there Parmenides throws into question whether the eidē are, only to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark