Results for 'Borgmann'

6 found
Order:
  1. Rethinking Techology in Work of A. Borgmann.Dedyulina Marina - 2014 - International Journal of Applied and Fundamental Research 2.
    Albert Borgmann is an American philosopher of technology, which is different from their contemporaries and predecessors in this area that explores the nature of high technology is not theoretical and empirically. The main problem in his studies is to understand and appreciate a useful understanding of human interaction with technology, specially designed to help humanity avoid the adverse effects of high technology.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Theological ethics and technological culture: A biocultural approach.Michael S. Hogue - 2007 - Zygon 42 (1):77-96.
    Abstract.This article examines an orientation for thinking theologically and ethically about the cultural pattern of technology and a vision for living responsibly within it. Building upon and joining select insights of philosophers Hans Jonas and Albert Borgmann, I recommend the analytic and evaluative leverage to be gained through development of an integrative biocultural theological anthropology.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Distracted from Meaning: A Philosophy of Smartphones.Tiger C. Roholt - 2022 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic.
    When our smartphones distract us, much more is at stake than a momentary lapse of attention. Our use of smartphones can interfere with the building-blocks of meaningfulness and the actions that shape our self-identity. -/- By analyzing social interactions and evolving experiences, Roholt reveals the mechanisms of smartphone-distraction that impact our meaningful projects and activities. Roholt’s conception of meaning in life draws from a disparate group of philosophers—Susan Wolf, John Dewey, Hubert Dreyfus, Martin Heidegger, and Albert Borgmann. Central to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Useful for What? Dewey's Call to Humanize Techno-Industrial Civilization.Steven Fesmire - 2016 - Pragmatism Today 7 (1):11-19.
    The heart of Dewey’s call to humanize techno-industrial civilization was to conceive science and technology in the service of aesthetic consummations. Hence his philosophy suggests a way to reclaim and affirm technology on behalf of living more fulfilling lives. He remains a powerful ally today in the fight against deadening efficiency, narrow means-end calculation, “frantic exploitation,” and the industrialization of everything. Nonetheless, it is common to depict him as a philosopher we should think around rather than with. The first section (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  81
    ‘Blessed are the breadmakers...’: Sociophobia, digital society and the enduring relevance of technological determinism.Gregory Morgan Swer - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):315-327.
    Technological determinism, as a position on the nature and effects of technology/technologies can be divided into optimistic and critical forms. The optimistic variety, of which contemporary cyber-utopianism is an instance, holds that the development of technology shapes or at least facilitates ameliorative alterations in society. The critical variety, on the other hand, tends to problematise or condemn the positive narrative of technological impact on human existence. Whilst the optimistic form still retains some academic credibility, especially concerning digital technologies, the critical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Authenticity, Right Relation and the Return of the Repressed Native in James Galvin’s "The Meadow".Ian K. Jensen - 2016 - Journal of Contemporary Thought 43:84-109.
    This essay reads acclaimed poet James Galvin’s 1992 semi-autobiographical novel through the lenses of Martin Heidegger’s notion of authenticity and Patrick Wolfe’s discussion of settler-colonialism. I argue that Lyle, arguably the novel’s main character, is portrayed as living “authentically” in contrast to the deep inauthenticity of Ferris. I connect Western authentic dwelling with settler-colonial logic, centering my account on the figures of the “lazy” and “magical” “Indian.” Ultimately, I find that far from rejecting settler-colonial logic Galvin’s text plays out of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark