Order:
See also
Brandon Dahm
Franciscan University of Steubenville
  1. A Perspectival Account of Acedia in the Writings of Kierkegaard.Jared Brandt, Brandon Dahm & Derek McAllister - 2020 - Religions 80 (11):1-23.
    Søren Kierkegaard is well-known as an original philosophical thinker, but less known is his reliance upon and development of the Christian tradition of the Seven Deadly Sins, in particular the vice of acedia, or sloth. As acedia has enjoyed renewed interest in the past century or so, commentators have attempted to pin down one or another Kierkegaardian concept (e.g., despair, heavy-mindedness, boredom, etc.) as the embodiment of the vice, but these attempts have yet to achieve any consensus. In our estimation, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  82
    The Acquired Virtues Are Real Virtues.Brandon Dahm - 2015 - Faith and Philosophy 32 (4):453-470.
    In a recent paper, Eleonore Stump argues that Aquinas thinks the acquired virtues are “not real at all” because they do not contribute to true moral life, which she argues is the life joined to God by the infused virtues and the gifts and fruits of the Holy Spirit. Against this, I argue in two stages that Aquinas thinks the acquired virtues are real virtues. First, I respond to Stump’s four arguments against the reality of the acquired virtues. Second, I (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  79
    Correcting Acedia Through Gratitude and Wonder.Brandon Dahm - 2021 - Religions 458 (12):1-15.
    In the capital vices tradition, acedia was fought through perseverance and manual labor. In this paper, I argue that we can also fight acedia through practicing wonder and gratitude. I show this through an account of moral formation developed out of the insight of the virtues and vices traditions that character traits affect how we see things. In the first section, I use Robert Roberts’s account of emotions to explain a mechanism by which virtues and vices affect vision and thus (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. After Survivalism and Corruptionism: Separated Souls as Incomplete Persons.Daniel D. De Haan & Brandon Dahm - 2020 - Quaestiones Disputatae 10 (2):161-176.
    Thomas Aquinas consistently defended the thesis that the separated rational soul that results from a human person’s death is not a person. Nevertheless, what has emerged in recent decades is a sophisticated disputed question between “survivalists” and “corruptionists” concerning the personhood of the separated soul that has left us with intractable disagreements wherein neither side seems able to convince the other. In our contribution to this disputed question, we present a digest of an unconsidered middle way: the separated soul is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark