6 found
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  1. Philosophy as Therapy - A Review of Konrad Banicki's Conceptual Model.Bruno Contestabile & Michael Hampe - manuscript
    In his article Banicki proposes a universal model for all forms of philosophical therapy. He is guided by works of Martha Nussbaum, who in turn makes recourse to Aristotle. As compared to Nussbaum’s approach, Banicki’s model is more medical and less based on ethical argument. He mentions Foucault’s vision to apply the same theoretical analysis for the ailments of the body and the soul and to use the same kind of approach in treating and curing them. In his interpretation of (...)
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  2. Is There a Predominance of Suffering?Bruno Contestabile - manuscript
    In 2022 a group of researchers published an empirical study on population ethical intuitions, which remained largely unnoticed, but has the potential to revolutionize the hedonist account of global well-being. The study disclosed that – in valuing entire populations – the majority’s intuitions are asymmetric about happiness and suffering. If this asymmetry is applied to the life evaluations of the World Happiness Report, then the aggregated total turns negative.
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  3. Negative Utilitarianism and Buddhist Intuition.Bruno Contestabile - 2014 - Contemporary Buddhism 15 (2):298-311.
    Various authors suggested that Buddhism may be a kind of negative utilitarianism. A closer examination of the corresponding intuitions leads to the following result: - Negative utilitarianism, understood as an umbrella term, models the asymmetry between suffering and happiness and therefore accords with the Buddhist intuition of universal compassion. - The Noble Truths of Buddhism accord with the negative utilitarian intuition that (global) suffering cannot be compensated by happiness. - Some forms of Buddhism and negative utilitarianism share the intuition that (...)
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  4.  93
    On the Buddhist Truths and the Paradoxes in Population Ethics.Bruno Contestabile - 2010 - Contemporary Buddhism 11 (1):103-113.
    Most discussion in population ethics has concentrated how to order populations by the relations “is better than” and “is as good as”. The topic is characterized by paradoxes which show that our considered beliefs are inconsistent in cases where the number of people and their welfare varies. The best known and most discussed example shattering our intuitions is Parfit’s Mere Addition Paradox. But why are paradoxes prevalent in population ethics? Can the analysis of Buddhist intuitions contribute to answer this question? (...)
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  5. Secular Buddhism and Justice.Bruno Contestabile - 2018 - Contemporary Buddhism 19 (2):237-250.
    The core idea of secular Buddhism is to grasp the spirit of early Buddhism and transpose it into the present. An application of this idea to the doctrine of rebirth leads to the following result: -/- The doctrine of rebirth cannot be revised in a strict sense, but there are some striking similarities between the ancient and modern (biological) view on the topic. Since the stream of genetic and epigenetic information has the power to create consciousness and reflects experiences of (...)
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  6.  55
    The Denial of the World from an Impartial View.Bruno Contestabile - 2016 - Contemporary Buddhism 17 (1):49-61.
    The Buddhist denial of the world seems hard to defend if it is confronted with empirical data. Surveys on subjective life satisfaction consistently report that the majority is satisfied with their lives. Is the desire to escape from the cycle of rebirth a sign of risk-aversion or even irrationality? How would an impartial observer evaluate the world? -/- An impartial view is achieved by interpreting the surveys on life satisfaction as probability distributions for life’s risks and chances. It turns out (...)
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