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  1. Identity or Status? Struggles over ‘Recognition’ in Fraser, Honneth, and Taylor.Christopher F. Zurn - 2003 - Constellations 10 (4):519-537.
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  2. Recognition, redistribution, and democracy: Dilemmas of Honneth's critical social theory.Christopher F. Zurn - 2005 - European Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):89–126.
    What does social justice require in contemporary societies? What are the requirements of social democracy? Who and where are the individuals and groups that can carry forward agendas for progressive social transformation? What are we to make of the so-called new social movements of the last thirty years? Is identity politics compatible with egalitarianism? Can cultural misrecognition and economic maldistribution be fought simultaneously? What of the heritage of Western Marxism is alive and dead? And how is current critical social theory (...)
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  3. Introduction.Christopher F. Zurn - 2009 - In Hans-Christoph Schmidt am Busch & Christopher F. Zurn (eds.), The Philosophy of Recognition: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Lexington Books. pp. 1-19.
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  4. Political Progress: Piecemeal, Pragmatic, and Processual.Christopher F. Zurn - 2020 - In Julia Christ, Kristina Lepold, Daniel Loick & Titus Stahl (eds.), Debating Critical Theory: Engagements with Axel Honneth. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. pp. 269-286.
    Are we witnessing progress or regress in the recent increasing popularity and electoral success of populist politicians and parties in consolidated democratic nations? ... Is the innovative use of popular referendum in Great Britain to settle fundamental constitutional questions a progressive or regressive innovation? ... Similarly, is the increasing use of constituent assemblies to change constitutions across the world evidence of progress in democratic constitutionalism, or, a worryingly regressive change back toward unmediated popular majoritarianism? ... This paper reflects on some (...)
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  5. Political Civility: Another Idealistic Illusion.Christopher F. Zurn - 2013 - Public Affairs Quarterly 27 (4).
    This paper argues that political civility is actually an illusionistic ideal and that, as such, realism counsels that we acknowledge both its promise and peril. Political civility is, I will argue, a tension-filled ideal. We have good normative reasons to strive for and encourage more civil political interactions, as they model our acknowledgement of others as equal citizens and facilitate high-quality democratic problem-solving. But we must simultaneously be attuned to civility’s limitations, its possible pernicious side-effects, and its potential for strategic (...)
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  6. Misrecognition, Marriage and Derecognition.Christopher F. Zurn - 2012 - In Shane O'Neill Nicholas H. Smith (ed.), Recognition Theory as Social Research: Investigating the Dynamics of Social Conflict. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Contemporary recognition theory has developed powerful tools for understanding a variety of social problems through the lens of misrecognition. It has, however, paid somewhat less attention to how to conceive of appropriate responses to misrecognition, usually making the tacit assumption that the proper societal response is adequate or proper affirmative recognition. In this paper I argue that, although affirmative recognition is one potential response to misrecognition, it is not the only such response. In particular, I would like to make the (...)
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  7. Constitutional Interpretation and Public Reason: Seductive Disanalogies.Christopher F. Zurn - 2020 - In Silje Langvatn, Wojciech Sadurski & Mattias Kumm (eds.), Public Reason and Courts. Cambridge University Press. pp. 323-349.
    Theorists of public reason such as John Rawls often idealize constitutional courts as exemplars of public reason. This paper raises questions about the seduction and limits of analogies between theorists’ account of public reason and actual constitutional jurisprudence. Examining the work product of the United States Supreme Court, the paper argues that while it does engage in reason-giving to support its decisions—as the public reason strategy suggests— those reasons are (largely) legalistic and specifically juristic reasons—not the theorists’ idealized moral-political reasons (...)
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  8. Schwerpunkt: Anerkennung.Christopher F. Zurn - 2005 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 53 (3):377-387.
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  9.  86
    Einleitung.Christopher F. Zurn - 2009 - In Christopher F. Zurn & Hans-Christoph Schmidt am Busch (eds.), Anerkennung. Berlin, Germany: Akademie Verlag. pp. 7-24.
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  10. Arguing over participatory parity.Christopher F. Zurn - 2003 - Philosophy Today 47 (5):176-189.
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  11. The Normative Claims of Three Types of Feminist Struggles for Recognition.Christopher F. Zurn - 1997 - Philosophy Today 41 (Supplement):73-78.
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  12. Deliberative Democracy and Constitutional Review.Christopher F. Zurn - 2002 - Law and Philosophy 21 (4/5):467 - 542.
    Recent work in democratic theory has seriously questioned the dominant pluralist model of self-government and recommended the adoption of a ‘deliberative’ conception of constitutional democracy. With this shift in basic political theory, the objection to judicial review, often voiced in jurisprudential theory, as an anti-democratic instance of paternalism merits another look. This paper argues that the significant differences between four recent theories of constitutional review—put forward by Ely, Perry, Dworkin, and Habermas—are best understood as arising from different positions taken on (...)
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  13. Review essay : The intersubjective basis of morality: William Rehg, insight and solidarity: The discourse ethics of Jürgen Habermas (berkeley: University of california press, 1994.Christopher F. Zurn - 1996 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 22 (6):113-126.
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  14. Group Balkanization or Societal Homogenization: Is There a Dilemma between Recognition and Distribution Struggles?Christopher F. Zurn - 2004 - Public Affairs Quarterly 18 (2):159-186.
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  15. Bringing discursive ideals to legal facts: On Baxter on Habermas. [REVIEW]Christopher F. Zurn - 2014 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (2):195-203.
    In Between Facts and Norms (1992) Habermas set out a theory of law and politics that is linked both to our high normative expectations and to the realities consequent upon the practices and institutions meant to put them into effect. The article discusses Hugh Baxter’s Habermas: The Discourse Theory of Law and Democracy and the drawbacks he finds in Habermas’ theory. It focuses on raising questions about and objections to some of the author’s leading claims.
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