17 found
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  1.  74
    Experience is Not The Whole Story: The Integral Role of the Situation in Dewey's Democracy and Education.David L. Hildebrand - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 52 (2):287-300.
    The central objective of Dewey’s Democracy and Education is to explain ‘what is needed to live a meaningful life and how can education contribute?’ While most acquainted with Dewey’s educational philosophy know that ‘experience’ plays a central role, the role of ‘situations’ may be less familiar or understood. This essay explains why ‘situation’ is inseparable from ‘experience’ and deeply important to Democracy and Education’s educational methods and rationales. First, a prefatory section explores how experience is invoked and involved in pedagogical (...)
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  2. Genuine Doubt and the Community in Peirce’s Theory of Inquiry.David L. Hildebrand - 1996 - Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (1):33-43.
    For Charles Peirce, the project of inquiry is a social one. Though inquiry, the passage from genuine doubt to settled belief, can be described on the individual level, its significance as a human activity is manifested in collective action. For any individual, Truth transcends experience and inquiry. But it does not transcend experience and inquiry altogether: is a fixed limit, an ideal, towards which a properly functioning community converges. What, in principle, makes the cohesion of such a community possible? Why (...)
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  3. Pragmatic Objectivity in History, Journalism and Philosophy.David L. Hildebrand - 2011 - Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (1):1-20.
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  4.  60
    The Paramount Importance of Experience and Situations in Dewey's Democracy and Education.David L. Hildebrand - 2016 - Educational Theory 66 (1-2):73-88.
    In this essay, David Hildebrand connects Democracy and Education to Dewey's wider corpus. Hildebrand argues that Democracy and Education's central objective is to offer a practical and philosophical answer to the question, What is needed to live a meaningful life, and how can education contribute? He argues, further, that this work is still plausible as “summing up” Dewey's overall philosophy due to its focus upon “experience” and “situation,” crucial concepts connecting Dewey's philosophical ideas to one another, to education, and to (...)
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  5.  71
    Philosophical Pragmatism and the Challenges of Information Technologies.David L. Hildebrand - 2023 - The Pluralist 18 (1):1-9.
    Overview of challenges facing philosophical analyses of experience in the face of life with constant connection, social media, and data mining.
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  6. Pragmatist Aesthetics and the Experience of Technology.David L. Hildebrand - 2018 - In Anders Buch & Theodore R. Schatzki (eds.), Questions of Practice in Philosophy and Social Theory. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 114-135.
    Abstract: For most people, mobile phones and various forms of personal information technology (PIT) have become standard equipment for everyday life. Recent theorists such as Sherry Turkle raise psychological and philosophical questions about the impact of such technologies and practices, but deeper further philosophical work is needed. This paper takes a pragmatic approach to examining the effects of PIT practices upon experience. After reviewing several main issues with technology raised by Communication theorists, the paper looks more deeply at Turkle’s analysis (...)
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  7. Comment on Tapley's "What is Wrong With Being a Pervert?".David L. Hildebrand - 2009 - Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (2):51-56.
    Comment on Robin Tapley's paper on whether or not the sexual aspect of sexual harms adds anything to the harm done. I argue it does not based on the grounds Tapley provides.
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  8. Putnam, Pragmatism, and Dewey.David L. Hildebrand - 2000 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 36 (1):109 - 132.
    Recent writings by Hilary Putnam indicate the seriousness with which he has moved toward pragmatism. Putnam has not only characterized his own position as similar to pragmatism, he has written a number of essays presenting the views of the classical pragmatists, especially James, Dewey, and Peirce. “Putnam, Pragmatism, and Dewey” examines fundamental problems with Putnam’s recent efforts, especially as they pertain to Dewey’s epistemology.
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  9.  67
    Was Kenneth Burke a Pragmatist?David L. Hildebrand - 1995 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 31 (3):632 - 658.
    Kenneth Burke's recent death has spurred academics in a variety of disciplines to reassess the import of his prolific output. As a specialist in American philosophy, I have begun to make inroads on a question I have heard thus far only in English and Communication departments: Should Kenneth Burke be considered a pragmatist. This paper seeks to persuade specialists in Pragmatism and American Philosophy that Burke's work has enough in common with the epistemological and metaphysical doctrines of Classical Pragmatism to (...)
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  10. Philosophy’s Relevance and the Pattern of Inquiry.David L. Hildebrand - 1999 - Teaching Philosophy 22 (4):377-389.
    The undergraduate philosophy major is often seen as an irrelevant degree. While this may be attributed to a number of causes, it is also occasion for academic philosophers to reevaluate pedagogical methods at the undergraduate level. The author evaluates typical pedagogical methods and argues that overemphasizing epistemological goals of philosophical investigation (e.g. truth and justification) instrumentalizes the process of inquiry and stifles students’ philosophical imagination, resulting in the impression of philosophy’s irrelevance. An alternative model is offered on the basis of (...)
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  11.  83
    Art is not Entertainment: John Dewey’s Pragmatist Defense of an Aesthetic Distinction.David L. Hildebrand - 2015 - Southwest Philosophy Review 31 (1):225-234.
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  12.  68
    Comment on Rosenbaum’s “Justice, The Lorax and the Environment”.David L. Hildebrand - 2014 - Southwest Philosophy Review 30 (2):29-35.
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  13.  75
    What is Wrong with Being a Pervert.David L. Hildebrand - 2009 - Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (1):173-179.
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  14.  82
    Dewey by Steven Fesmire.David L. Hildebrand - 2015 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):543-549.
    In recent years, a genre of introduction to philosophical figures and movements for non-specialists has gained in popularity; these introductions aim to be neither too cursory nor too laden with academic detail. Oxford’s “Very Short Introductions” and the “Wadsworth Notes” series are examples of the cursory type, while academic monographs are examples of the detailed type. Steven Fesmire’s Dewey is a welcome and unique contribution to the new introductory genre, joining similar efforts such as Raymond Boisvert’s John Dewey Rethinking Our (...)
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  15.  85
    Epistemic and Rhetorical Remedies for the Evolution/Intelligent Design Predicament.David L. Hildebrand - 2008 - Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (1):43-52.
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  16.  89
    Kimball on Whitehead and Perception.David L. Hildebrand - 1993 - Process Studies 22 (1):13-20.
    In "The Incoherence of Whitehead’s Theory of Perception" (PS 9:94-104), Robert H. Kimball tries to show how Alfred North Whitehead’s account of perception is a failed attempt to reconcile two traditional theories of perception: phenomenological (or sense-data) theory and causal (or physiological) theory. Whitehead fails, Kimball argues, in two main ways. First because his notion of symbolic reference requires the simultaneous enjoyment of perceptions in the mode of presentational immediacy and causal efficacy. Kimball believes this experience is, in principle, impossible (...)
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  17. The Human Eros: Eco-Ontology and the Aesthetics of Existence by Thomas M. Alexander. [REVIEW]David L. Hildebrand - 2014 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (2):308-313.
    The Human Eros is an outstanding accomplishment, a work of genuine wisdom. It combines meticulous scholarship with an enviable mastery of cultural and philosophical history to address pressing concerns of human beings, nature, and philosophy itself. While comprised of essays spanning over two decades, the book presents a powerfully coherent philosophical vision which Alexander names, alternately, “eco-ontology,” “humanistic naturalism,” and “ecological humanism.” Whatever the name, the approach is humane and intellectually compelling, offering insight and direction to pragmatism, aesthetics, existentialism, environmental (...)
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