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Fiona Macpherson
University of Glasgow
  1. XV—Cross‐Modal Experiences.Fiona Macpherson - 2011 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (3pt3):429-468.
    This paper provides a categorization of cross-modal experiences. There are myriad forms. Doing so allows us to think clearly about the nature of different cross-modal experiences and allows us to clearly formulate competing hypotheses about the kind of experiences involved in different cross-modal phenomena.
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  2. Cognitive Penetration and Predictive Coding: A Commentary on Lupyan.Fiona Macpherson - 2015 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (4):571-584.
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  3. Perception, Philosophical Perspectives.Fiona Macpherson - 2009 - In Tim Bayne, Axel Cleeremans & P. Wilken (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    This paper provides an introduction to, and overview of, the Philosophy of Perception.
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  4. Impossible Figures.Fiona Macpherson - 2010 - In E. B. Goldstein (ed.), SAGE Encyclopedia of Perception. Sage Publications.
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  5.  27
    Is Perception Cognitively Penetrable? A Philosophically Satisfying and Empirically Testable Reframing.Gary Lupyan, Dustin Stokes, Fiona Macpherson, Rasha Abdel Rahman & Robert Goldstone - 2013 - Proceedings of the 35th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society 1:91-2.
    The question of whether perception can be penetrated by cognition is in the limelight again. The reason this question keeps coming up is that there is so much at stake: Is it possible to have theory-neutral observation? Is it possible to study perception without recourse to expectations, context, and beliefs? What are the boundaries between perception, memory, and inference (and do they even exist)? Are findings from neuroscience that paint a picture of perception as an inherently bidirectional and interactive process (...)
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