Order:
Disambiguations
Ian Angus [5]Ian H. Angus [1]
See also
  1. Walking on Two Legs: On The Very Possibility of a Heideggerian Marxism.Ian Angus - 2005 - Human Studies 28 (3):335-352.
    An extended review essay on Andrew Feenberg's Heidegger and Marcuse that argues that the concept of negation in Hegel is distinct from that in Heidegger which makes such an attempted synthesis problematic.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2. Disenchantment and Modernity: The Mirror of Technique.Ian H. Angus - 1983 - Human Studies 6 (1):141 - 166.
    A critical analysis of Alfred Schuetz' conception of rationality based upon Edmund Husserl's phenomenology.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Heideggerian Marxism. [REVIEW]Ian Angus - 2009 - Symposium 13 (1):113-136.
    An extended review of the English collection of Marcuse's essays and interviews on Heidegger that addresses the philosophical basis of a synthesis of Marx and Heidegger.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Place and Locality in Heidegger’s Late Thought.Ian Angus - 2001 - Symposium 5 (1):5-23.
    Distinguishes the concepts of place and locality in Heidegger's late work and argues that there is an emergent distinction which the essay goes on to clarify further.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Pathos of a First Meeting: Particularity and Singularity in the Critique of Technological Civilization.Ian Angus - 2012 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 16 (1):179-202.
    A philosophical critique of George Grant's use of Heidegger that refers in detail to Reiner Schurmann to distinguish the terms "particularity" and "singularity.".
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  60
    The Pathos of a First Meeting: Particularity and Singularity the Critique of Technological Civilization.Ian Angus - 2012 - Symposium 16 (1):179-202.
    In this essay, I will outline the positive content of George Grant's conception of "particularity" and clarify it by comparing it to Reiner Schürmann's similar concept of "singularity" as a starting point for an engagement with the positive good to which it refers. In conclusion, a five-step existential logic will he presented, which, I will suggest, can resolve the important aspects of the difference between them.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark