4 found
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  1. Posthuman to Inhuman: mHealth Technologies and the Digital Health Assemblage.Jack Black & Jim Cherrington - 2022 - Theory and Event 25 (4):726--750.
    In exploring the intra-active, relational and material connections between humans and non- humans, proponents of posthumanism advocate a questioning of the ‘human’ beyond its traditional anthropocentric conceptualization. By referring specifically to controversial developments in mHealth applications, this paper critically diverges from posthuman accounts of human/non-human assemblages. Indeed, we argue that, rather than ‘dissolving’ the human subject, the power of assemblages lie in their capacity to highlight the antagonisms and contradictions that inherently affirm the importance of the subject. In outlining this (...)
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  2. The Electric Mountain Bike as Pharmakon: Examining the Problems and Possibilities of an Emerging Technology.Jim Cherrington & Jack Black - 2023 - Mobilities 18 (6):1000-1015.
    In the last decade there has been an upsurge in the popularity of electric mountain bikes. However, opinion is divided regarding the implications of this emerging technology. Critics warn of the dangers they pose to landscapes, habitats, and ecological diversity, whilst advocates highlight their potential in increasing the accessibility of the outdoors for riders who would otherwise be socially and/or physically excluded. Drawing on interview data with 30 electric mountain bike users in England, this paper represents one of the first (...)
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  3. Temporal Ontology in Ecology: Developing an ecological awareness through time, temporality and the past-present parallax.Jack Black & Jim Cherrington - 2021 - Environmental Philosophy 18 (1):41-63.
    Theoretical applications of time and temporality remain a key consideration for both climate scientists and the humanities. By way of extending this importance, we critically examine Timothy Morton’s proposed “ecological awareness” alongside Slavoj Žižek’s “parallax view”. In doing so, the article introduces a “past-present parallax” in order to contest that, while conceptions of the past are marked by “lack”, equally, our conceptions of and relations to Nature remain grounded in an ontological incompleteness, marked by contingency. This novel approach presents an (...)
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  4. 'Nature doesn't care that we're there': Re-Symbolizing Nature's 'Natural' Contingency.Jack Black & Jim Cherrington - 2020 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 14 (1).
    This article draws upon the work of Timothy Morton and Slavoj Žižek in order to critically examine how mountain bike trail builders orientated themselves within nature relations. Beginning with a discussion of the key ontological differences between Morton’s object-oriented ontology and Žižek’s blend of Hegelian-Lacanianism, we explore how Morton’s dark ecology and Žižek’s account of the radical contingency of nature, can offer parallel paths to achieving an ecological awareness that neither idealises nor mythologises nature, but instead, acknowledges its strange and (...)
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