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John Hardwig
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  1. The Role of Trust in Knowledge.John Hardwig - 1991 - Journal of Philosophy 88 (12):693-708.
    Most traditional epistemologists see trust and knowledge as deeply antithetical: we cannot know by trusting in the opinions of others; knowledge must be based on evidence, not mere trust. I argue that this is badly mistaken. Modern knowers cannot be independent and self-reliant. In most disciplines, those who do not trust cannot know. Trust is thus often more epistemically basic than empirical evidence or logical argument, for the evidence and the argument are available only through trust. Finally, since the reliability (...)
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  2.  47
    Ownership, Possession, and Consumption: On the Limits of Rational Consumption.John Hardwig - 2015 - Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (3):281-296.
    We need to understand, and on a philosophical level, our consumer mentality. For ours is a consumer society. Yet (pace environmental philosophers) philosophers have had almost nothing to say. This paper is a start toward a normative philosophy of consumption. It explores a distinction which, if viable, has far-reaching implications — the distinction between ownership and what I call “possession.” This distinction marks two different senses in which a good or service can be mine. I argue that an approach to (...)
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  3.  29
    To Die or Not to Die. [REVIEW]Larry R. Churchill, Daniel Callahan, Elizabeth A. Linehan, Anne E. Thal, Frances A. Graves, Alice V. Prendergast, Donald G. Flory & John Hardwig - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (6):4.
    Letters commenting on Hardwig, J "Is There a Duty to Die?" with a reply to those letters by the author.
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  4.  50
    Patient Informed Choice for Altruism.M. D. Doukas, David J. & John Hardwig - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (4):397-402.
    Respect for persons protects patients regarding their own healthcare decisions. Patient informed choice for altruism is a proposed means for a fully autonomous patient with decisionmaking capacity to limit his or her own treatment for altruistic reasons. An altruistic decision could bond the patient with others at the end of life. We contend that PICA can also be an advance directive option. The proxy, family, and physicians must be reminded that a patient’s altruistic treatment refusal should be respected.
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    Families and Futility: Forestalling Demands for Futile Treatment.John Hardwig - 2005 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 16 (4):335-344.
    The most common approach to the problem of requests for futile treatment – the hospital futility policy – rests on the assumption that demands for futile treatment are both intractable and irrational. But there is another approach to the futility problem, an approach that would be dialogic, piecemeal, and case-by-case. This is the only approach that attempts to deal with both the hospital’s problem and the patient’s or family’s problem that motivates the request/demand for futile treatments. As such, it holds (...)
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  6.  79
    Men and Abortion Decisions.John Hardwig - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (2):41-45.
    For all their differences, the “pro-choice” and the “pro-life” views of abortion are largely in agreement about one aspect of abortion decisions: where an abortion is morally legitimate, the pregnant woman should be permitted to decide whether or not to have an abortion. But I argue in this paper that if the man who will become the father of the fetus is known, if he believes that he will not be able (or permitted) to simply walk away from his biological (...)
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  7.  50
    Privacy, Self Knowledge, and the Commune:Toward an Epistemology of the Family.John Hardwig - 1997 - In Hilde Lindeman Nelson (ed.), Feminism and Families. New York, NY: pp. 105-115.
    Advocates of communal living often urge that life in a commune provides the framework for a deeper knowledge of other people. I believe this is clearly true and because it is true, communal living is also instrumental in promoting self knowledge. The dialogue that is part of the life of a commune enables one to incorporate the insights of the other members into his understanding of himself and his world.
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