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Jonathan Fine
University of Hawai'i, Manoa
  1.  78
    Beauty Before the Eyes of Others.Jonathan Fine - 2016 - In Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics. Fribourg: The European Society for Aesthetics. pp. 164-176.
    This paper pursues the philosophical significance of a relatively unexplored point of Platonic aesthetics: the social dimension of beauty. The social dimension of beauty resides in its conceptual connection to shame and honour. This dimension of beauty is fundamental to the aesthetic education of the Republic, as becoming virtuous for Plato presupposes a desire to appear and to be admired as beautiful. The ethical significance of beauty, shame, and honour redound to an ethically rich notion of appearing before others which (...)
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  2. Destrée, Pierre, and Penelope Murray, Eds. A Companion to Ancient Aesthetics. Hoboken, Nj: Wiley‐Blackwell, 2015, XIV + 538 Pp., 26 B&W Illus., $195.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]Jonathan Fine - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 77 (2):222-225.
    Review of the first comprehensive companion to the growing scholarship on ancient Greek and Roman aesthetics.
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  3. Laughing to Learn: Irony in the Republic as Pedagogy.Jonathan Fine - 2011 - Polis 28 (2):235-49.
    Recent commentators have attended to dramatic and ironic aspects of Plato’s Republic. But a more sustained examination of the relation between irony and the exchanges of Socrates and Glaucon is required because a crucial purpose and presentation of the irony have largely gone unnoticed. I argue that Socrates employs irony in part to parody Glaucon’s extremism and that he does so to exhort Glaucon to think critically. I examine how Socrates uses the term makaria (blessedness) primarily ironically and pedagogically. A (...)
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  4.  17
    Plato and the Dangerous Pleasures of Poikilia.Jonathan Fine - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-18.
    A significant strand of the ethical psychology, aesthetics and politics of Plato's Republic revolves around the concept of poikilia, ‘fascinating variety’. Plato uses the concept to caution against harmful appetitive pleasures purveyed by democracy and such artistic or cultural practices as mimetic poetry. His aim, this article shows, is to contest a prominent conceptual connection between poikilia and beauty (kallos, to kalon). Exploiting tensions in the archaic and classical Greek concept, Plato associates poikilia with dangerous pleasures to redirect admiration toward (...)
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  5. The Guise of the Beautiful: Symposium 204d Ff.Jonathan Fine - 2019 - Phronesis 65 (2):129-152.
    A crux of Plato’s Symposium is how beauty relates to the good. Diotima distinguishes beauty from the good, I show, to explain how erotic pursuits are characteristically ambivalent and opaque. Human beings pursue beauty without knowing why or thinking it good; yet they are rational, if aiming at happiness. Central to this reconstruction is a passage widely taken to show that beauty either coincides with the good or demands disinterested admiration. It shows rather that what one loves as beautiful does (...)
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