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Julia Ng
Goldsmiths College, University of London
  1. Each Thing a Thief: Walter Benjamin on the Agency of Objects.Julia Ng - 2011 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 44 (4):382-402.
    "I have a tree, which grows here in my close, / That mine own use invites me to cut down, / And shortly I must fell it" (Shakespeare 2001, 168)—Timon's lament, which in Shakespeare's rendition occurs shortly before its utterer's demise "upon the beached verge of the salt flood" (2001, 168) beyond the perimeter of Athens, is an indictment of the nature that Timon finds unable to escape. Having given away his wealth in misguided generosity to a host of parasitic (...)
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  2.  65
    Acts of Time: Cohen and Benjamin on Mathematics and History.Julia Ng - 2017 - Paradigmi. Rivista di Critica Filosofica 2017 (1):41-60.
    This paper argues that the principle of continuity that underlies Benjamin’s understanding of what makes the reality of a thing thinkable, which in the Kantian context implies a process of “filling time” with an anticipatory structure oriented to the subject, is of a different order than that of infinitesimal calculus—and that a “discontinuity” constitutive of the continuity of experience and (merely) counterposed to the image of actuality as an infinite gradation of ultimately thetic acts cannot be the principle on which (...)
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  3. Kant's Theory of Experience at the End of the War: Scholem and Benjamin Read Cohen.Julia Ng - 2012 - Modern Language Notes 127 (3):462-484.
    At the end of one side of a manuscript entitled “On Kant” and housedin the Scholem Archive in Jerusalem, one reads the following pro-nouncement: “it is impossible to understand Kant today.” 1 Whatever it might mean to “understand” Kant, or indeed, whatever “Kant” is heremeant to be understood, it is certain, according to the manuscript,that such understanding cannot come about by way of purporting tohave returned to or spoken in the name of “Kant.” For “[t]oday,” sothe document begins, “there are (...)
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  4.  30
    ‘+1’: Scholem and the Paradoxes of the Infinite.Julia Ng - 2014 - RIVISTA ITALIANA DI FILOSOFIA DEL LINGUAGGIO 8 (2):196-210.
    This article draws on several crucial and unpublished manuscripts from the Scholem Archive in exploration of Gershom Scholem's youthful statements on mathematics and its relation to extra-mathematical facts and, more broadly, to a concept of history that would prove to be consequential for Walter Benjamin's own thinking on "messianism" and a "futuristic politics." In context of critiquing the German Youth Movement's subsumption of active life to the nationalistic conditions of the "earth" during the First World War, Scholem turns to mathematics (...)
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