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  1. What's so funny? Modelling incongruity in humour production.Rachel Hull, Sümeyra Tosun & Jyotsna Vaid - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
    Finding something humorous is intrinsically rewarding and may facilitate emotion regulation, but what creates humour has been underexplored. The present experimental study examined humour generated under controlled conditions with varying social, affective, and cognitive factors. Participants listed five ways in which a set of concept pairs (e.g. MONEY and CHOCOLATE) were similar or different in either a funny way (intentional humour elicitation) or a “catchy” way (incidental humour elicitation). Results showed that more funny responses were produced under the incidental condition, (...)
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  2. Of black sheep and wrhite crows: Extending the bilingual dual coding theory to memory for idioms.Lena Pritchett, Jyotsna Vaid & Sumeyra Tosun - 2016 - Cogent Psychology 3 (1):1-18.
    Are idioms stored in memory in ways that preserve their surface form or language or are they represented amodally? We examined this question using an inci- dental cued recall paradigm in which two word idiomatic expressions were presented to adult bilinguals proficient in Russian and English. Stimuli included phrases with idiomat- ic equivalents in both languages (e.g. “empty words/пycтыe cлoвa”) or in one language only (English—e.g. “empty suit/пycтoй кocтюм” or Russian—e.g. “empty sound/пycтoй звyк”), or in neither language (e.g. “empty rain/пycтoй (...)
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  3. What affects facing direction in profile drawing? A meta-analytic inquiry.Sumeyra Tosun & Jyotsna Vaid - 2014 - Perception 43 (12):1377-1392.
    Two meta-analyses were conducted to examine two potential sources of spatial orientation biases in human profile drawings by brain-intact individuals. The first examined profile facing direction as function of hand used to draw. The second examined profile facing direction in relation to directional scanning biases related to reading/writing habits. Results of the first meta-analysis, based on 27 study samples with 4171 participants, showed that leftward facing of profiles (from the viewer's perspective) was significantly associated with using the right hand to (...)
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  4. Perceiving and responding to embarrassing predicaments across languages: Cultural influences on the mental lexicon.Jyotsna Vaid, Hyun Choi, Hsin-Chin Chen & Michael Friedman - 2008 - Mental Lexicon 3 (1):121-147.
    The experience of embarrassment was explored in two experiments comparing monolingual and bilingual speakers from cultures varying in the degree of elabo- ration of the embarrassment lexicon. In Experiment 1, narratives in English or Korean depicting three types of embarrassing predicaments were to be rated on their embarrassability and humorousness by Korean-English bilinguals, Korean monolinguals, and Euro-American monolinguals. All groups judged certain predicaments (involving social gaffes) to be the most embarrassing. However, significant group and language differences occurred in judgments of (...)
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  5. On the interpretation of alienable vs. inalienable possession: A psycholinguistic investigation.Frantisek Lichtenberk, Jyotsna Vaid & Hsin-Chin Chen - 2011 - Cognitive Linguistics 22 (4):659-689.
    Oceanic languages typically make a grammatical contrast between expres- sions of alienable and inalienable possession. Moreover, further distinctions are made in the alienable category but not in the inalienable category. The present research tests the hypothesis that there is a good motivation for such a development in the former case. As English does not have a grammaticalized distinction between alienable and inalienable possession, it provides a good testing ground. Three studies were conducted. In Study 1, participants were asked to write (...)
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  6. An examination of women's professional visibility in cognitive psychology.Jyotsna Vaid & Lisa Geraci - 2016 - Feminism and Psychology 26 (3):292-319.
    Mainstream psychological research has been characterized as androcentric in its construction of males as the norm. Does an androcentric bias also characterize the professional visibility of psychologists? We examined this issue for cognitive psychology, where the gender distribution in doctoral degrees has been roughly equal for several decades. Our investigation revealed that, across all indicators surveyed, male cognitive psychologists are more visible than their female counterparts: they are over-represented in professional society governance, as editors-in-chief of leading journals in the field, (...)
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  7. Making a story make sense: Does evidentiality matter in discourse coherence?Sumeyra Tosun & Jyotsna Vaid - 2016 - Applied Psycholinguistics 37:1337-1367.
    Evidentiality refers to the linguistic marking of the nature/directness of source of evidence of an asserted event. Some languages (e.g., Turkish) mark source obligatorily in their grammar, while other languages (e.g., English) provide only lexical options for conveying source. The present study examined whether or under what conditions firsthand source information is relied on more than nonfirsthand sources in establishing discourse coherence. Turkish- and English-speaking participants read a series of somewhat incongruous two-sentence narratives and were to come up with a (...)
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