Order:
See also
Mateo Duque
State University of New York at Binghamton
  1.  53
    In and Out of Character: Socratic Mimēsis.Mateo Duque - 2020 - Dissertation, Cuny Graduate Center
    In the "Republic," Plato has Socrates attack poetry’s use of mimēsis, often translated as ‘imitation’ or ‘representation.’ Various scholars (e.g. Blondell 2002; Frank 2018; Halliwell 2009; K. Morgan 2004) have noticed the tension between Socrates’ theory critical of mimēsis and Plato’s literary practice of speaking through various characters in his dialogues. However, none of these scholars have addressed that it is not only Plato the writer who uses mimēsis but also his own character, Socrates. At crucial moments in several dialogues, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  30
    Two Portraits of Protagoras in Plato: Theaetetus vs. Protagoras.Mateo Duque - 2023 - Illinois Classical Studies 47 (2):359-382.
    This article will contrast two portrayals of Protagoras: one in the "Theaetetus," where Socrates discusses Protagorean theory and even comes to his defense by imitating the deceased sophist; and another in the "Protagoras," where Socrates recounts his encounter with the sophist. I suggest that Plato wants listeners and readers of the dialogues to hear the dissonance between the two portraits and to wonder why Socrates so distorts Protagoras in the "Theaetetus." Protagoras in the "Protagoras" behaves and speaks in ways that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  28
    Performing Philosophy: The Pedagogy of Plato’s Academy Reimagined.Mateo Duque - 2023 - In Heather L. Reid, Mark Ralkowski & Henry C. Curcio (eds.), Paideia and Performance: Selected Essays from the 7th Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Hellenic Heritage of Sicily and Southern Italy. Siracusa: Parnassos Press. pp. 87-106.
    In this paper, drawing on evidence internal to the Platonic dialogues (supplemented with some ancient testimonia), I answer the question, “How did Plato teach in the Academy?” My reconstruction of Plato’s pedagogy in the Academy is that there was a single person who read the dialogue aloud like a rhapsode (this is in contrast to the dramatic theatrical hypothesis, in which several speakers function as actors in the performance of a dialogue). After the rhapsodic reading, students were allowed to ask (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  30
    The Bloomsbury Handbook of Plato (2nd edition).Gerald Press & Mateo Duque (eds.) - 2022 - London: Bloomsbury.
    This essential reference text on the life, thought and writings of Plato uses over 160 short, accessible articles to cover a complete range of topics for both the first-time student and seasoned scholar of Plato and ancient philosophy. It is organized into five parts illuminating Plato’s life, the whole of the Dialogues attributed to him, the Dialogues’ literary features, the concepts and themes explored within them and Plato’s reception via his influence on subsequent philosophers and the various interpretations of his (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  30
    “Οὐκ ἔστιν” (141e8): The Performative Contradiction of the First Hypothesis.Mateo Duque - 2022 - In Luc Brisson, Macé Arnaud & Olivier Renaut (eds.), Plato’s Parmenides: Selected Papers from the Twelfth Symposium Platonicum. Baden-Baden: Academia Verlag. pp. 347-354.
    At the end of the first hypothesis, Parmenides gets Aristotle to agree that being [οὐσίας] must be in time; that is, that being must partake in at least one of the temporal modes: either to have been in the past, to be in the present, or it will be in the future (140e-142a). If this is true, then “the one does not partake in being” (141e7-8), meaning temporal being—to which Aristotle agrees, saying “Apparently not” (141e9). Parmenides then gets Aristotle to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  22
    Entry on "Metatheatre" in Section 4 "Concepts, Themes and Topics Treated in the Dialogues" in The Bloomsbury Handbook of Plato (2nd edition).Mateo Duque - 2022 - In Gerald Press & Mateo Duque (eds.), The Bloomsbury Handbook of Plato. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 287-289.
    This is a short entry on "Metatheatre" in Section 4, "Concepts, Themes and Topics Treated in the Dialogues," in The Bloomsbury Handbook of Plato, edited by Gerald Press and Mateo Duque.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Two Passions in Plato’s Symposium: Diotima’s To Kalon as a Reorientation of Imperialistic Erōs.Mateo Duque - 2019 - In Heather L. Reid & Tony Leyh (eds.), Looking at Beauty to Kalon in Western Greece: Selected Essays from the 2018 Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece. Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press – Fonte Aretusa. pp. 95-110.
    In this essay, I propose a reading of two contrasting passions, two kinds of erōs, in the "Symposium." On the one hand, there is the imperialistic desire for conquering and possessing that Alcibiades represents; and on the other hand, there is the productive love of immortal wisdom that Diotima represents. It’s not just what Alcibiades says in the Symposium, but also what he symbolizes. Alcibiades gives a speech in honor of Socrates and of his unrequited love for him, but even (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  18
    Entry on "Comedy" in Section 3 "Important Features of the Dialogues" in The Bloomsbury Handbook of Plato (2nd edition).Mateo Duque - 2022 - In Gerald Press & Mateo Duque (eds.), The Bloomsbury Handbook of Plato. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 140-143.
    This is a short entry on "Comedy" in Section 3, "Important Features of the Dialogues," in The Bloomsbury Handbook of Plato, edited by Gerald Press and Mateo Duque.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark