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  1. Will.Narve Strand - 2015 - In Jon Stewart, Steven M. Emmanuel & William McDonald (eds.), Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 15, tome VI. Ashgate. pp. 235-42.
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  2. The Limits of Silence: Descartes, Heidegger, and Wittgenstein on Philosophy and Ordinary Language.Narve Strand - 2005 - In N. D. Smith & J. P. Taylor (eds.), Descartes and Cartesianism. Cambridge Scholars Press.
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  3. Augustine on Predestination and Divine Simplicity: The Problem of Compatibility.Narve Strand - 2001 - Studia Patristica 38:290-305.
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  4.  88
    Voting.Narve Strand - 2015 - In Jon Stewart, Steven M. Emmanuel & William McDonald (eds.), Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 15. tome VI. Ashgate. pp. 229-34.
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  5. The Paradox of the Present.Narve Strand - 2000 - Opuscula 2:39-55.
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  6. World That Matters: Reply to Poul Houe.Narve Strand - 2011 - In Roman Kralik & Abrahim H. Kahn (eds.), In the Shadow of Kierkegaard. Kierkegaard Circle, University of Toronto/Central European Research Institiute of Søren Kierkegaard.
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  7.  82
    Decision/Resolve.Narve Strand - 2014 - In Jon Stewart (ed.), Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 15, tome II. Ashgate. pp. 135-138.
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  8. Normative Inquiry After Wittgenstein.Narve Strand - 2007 - Dissertation, Boston College
    "Dissertation Advisor: Richard Cobb-Stevens Second Reader: David Rasmussen -/- My overall concern is with the Kantian legacy in political thought. More specifically, I want to know if normative talk is still viable in the wake of Wittgenstein and the linguistic turn; and if so, in what form. Most commentators today believe we have to choose between these two thinkers, either sacrificing a real concern with normativity (“relativism”) or a convincing engagement with our ordinary language (“universalism”). I follow Hilary Putnam in (...)
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