Order:
See also
Piyali Mitra
University Of Calcutta
  1. Invisible Women in Reproductive Technologies: Critical Reflections.Piyali Mitra - 2018 - Indian Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (2):NS: 113-9.
    The recent spectacular progress in assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) has resulted in new ethical dilemmas. Though women occupy a central role in the reproductive process, within the ART paradigm, the importance accorded to the embryo commonly surpasses that given to the mother. This commentary questions the increasing tendency to position the embryonic subject in an antagonistic relation with the mother. I examine how the mother’s reproductive autonomy is compromised in relation to that of her embryo and argue in favour of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Philosophical Ruminations About Embryo Experimentation with Reference to Reproductive Technologies in Jewish “Halakhah”.Piyali Mitra - 2017 - IAFOR Journal of Ethics, Religion and Philosophy 3 (2):5-19.
    The use of modern medical technologies and interventions involves ethical and legal dilemmas which are yet to be solved. For the religious Jews the answer lies in Halakhah. The objective of this paper is to unscramble the difficult conundrum possessed by the halakhalic standing concerning the use of human embryonic cell for research. It also aims to take contemporary ethical issues arising from the use of technologies and medical advances made in human reproduction and study them from an abstract philosophical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  68
    Assisted Conception and Embryo Research with Reference to the Tenets of Catholic Christianity.Piyali Mitra - 2017 - Online International Interdisciplinary Research Journal 7 (3):165-173.
    Religion has a considerable influence over the public’s attitudes towards science and technologies. The objective of the paper is to understand the ethical and religious problems concerning the use of embryo for research in assisting conception for infertile couples from the perspective of Catholic Christians. This paper seeks to explain our preliminary reflections on how religious communities particularly the Catholic Christian communities respond to and assess the ethics of reproductive technologies and embryo research. Christianity as a whole lacks a unified (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark