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  1.  43
    The Part Played by Value in the Modification of Open Into Attractive Possibilities.Robert Welsh Jordan - 1997 - In Lester Embree & James G. Hart (eds.), Phenomenology of Values and Valuing. Springer. pp. 81-94.
    Moral value as it was understood by Nicolai Hartmann and by Max Scheler belongs uniquely to volitions or willings, to dispositions to will and to persons as beings capable of willing. Moreover, as understood in this paper as well as by Hartmann, Scheler, and Husserl, every volition necessarily involves if not actual valuings then reference to retained valuings and potential valuings as well as to cognitive mental phenomena. As used here, the terms 'volition' and 'willing' denote mental traits, such as (...)
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  2.  20
    Das Gesetz, die Anklage und Ks Prozess.Robert Welsh Jordan - 1980 - In Jahrbuch der deutschen Schillergesellschaft. Alfred Kröner Verlag. pp. 332-356.
    DESCRIPTION—An essay showing Kafka's The Trial to be written as illustration of an important theory of natural that remains quite unknown all but a very few critics and commentators. CONTENTS 1. The charge against Joseph K. Ignorance of the natural sanction of law and custom a. Brentano's conception of natural law b. Natural law and human need in the Protagoras 2. Correct choice: Brentano's ethical theory a. The empirical origin of the concepts "good" and "better": analogous derivation of "true" b. (...)
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  3.  97
    Acquired Innocence. The Law, the Charge, and K.'S Trial: Franz Kafka and Franz Brentano.Robert Welsh Jordan - manuscript
    Kafka's work provoked more than three decades of interpretations before Wagenbach provided information showing that Kafka was quite familiar with the work of Brentano and his Prague followers, including their unique conceptions of natural law, ethical concepts, and human acquaintance with them. Kafka took a lively interest in discussions in this Prague circle, and The Trial may without violence be read as a deliberate illustration for issues in philosophy of law as they would have been understood within this circle. This (...)
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